The Evolution of The “Selfie”

411_DS6567214Through the evolution of the internet, the self-portrait became the fixed photo worth taking.  The photographic images change so much on social-networking sites that one photo of you is never enough for new eyes to rate.

An increasing number of posts on social networking ask other girls to “like their status” and get “rated.” To some, the higher the number means being physically beautiful. As intense as that sounds, social networking sites push many young people, namely girls, to post photos that mimic Andy Warhol’s representation of “Monroe.”

It is great to see young people trying the style of a contemporary artist, but when does it begin to cross the line of being obsessed with their looks?

The Self-Portrait and Social Networks: Just Like Marilyn?

The fact that girls mimic Andy Warhol’s representation of “Monroe” is not because that they’ve all become narcissistic, vain young people, but they want to feel like they too have symbolically interpreted their physical features with the same self-worth as Monroe did during her time.

Marisela Lariz, 20, says, “Girls put photos of themselves and their bodies because they see other prettier girls. They may feel insecure, when really they should feel confident to know that no one is better than anyone else. Everyone is different and beautiful in their own way.”

Girl’s photo representations are a form of Monroe’s continued living because she is remembered for loving herself as a full figured woman.

Yasmine Gonzalez, 17, says, “Some girls may think they’re ugly when they’re not. Every girl is beautiful. And I think they just say negative things about themselves because what others have said about them.”

Girls try to attain that same value Monroe achieved as a full figured woman, by creating multiple images of themselves in different poses in an effort to become like the iconic piece. Self-photos are normative. They place their heads, almost like a magazine advertisement does when trying to sell a product. These young girls begin to resemble their clothes, their half short shorts and their hair styles. Long gone are the images to show real life.

The Costs of Getting  “Likes”

Does seeing so many young girls with the need to show their figure while they talk to, hang with, or even ignore someone else in the photo, make it sociologically corrupt?

Paola Hernandez, 13, exclaims, “Some people judge you on your clothes. The internet is sort of to blame. Some people are cyber bullies!”

For example, a piece created by Melissa Ventura, 15, shows her in colored images using ½ of the screen unlike that of Warhol’s piece, which uses the entire canvas.Ventura, says, “We had to do that for an Art Project.”

Gonzalez adds, “There [are] a lot of creepers on here who be trying to talk to people and say sweet stuff and pretend to be someone else and [eventually] meet up with the girl. Next thing you, know, that girl could be missing since she posted photos of herself. I see a lot of girls do that, I don’t like it. They want attention and are desperate for Facebook likes and that way can comment on how “sexy, hot, cute, pretty, etc.”

Joselin Garcia, 13 agrees. She says, “People on Facebook like or comment on their photos. It could be a reason why girls would be obsessed with their appearance.”

Gonzalez is quick to add, “Well I blame the Internet and the people. The Internet, because they don’t delete anything inappropriate that people post, they leave it there. And people, they shouldn’t even be posting stuff like that in the Internet.”
Still whether you agree or not, girls only become confident if the ability to become educated is instilled at a young age. Lariz says it best, “True confidence leaves no room for jealousy when you know you are great. There is no need to hate [on each other.]”

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