13-Year-Old Shark Tank Winner to Keynote Startup Chica

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                 

Latinitas’ Startup Chica Conference Aims to Teach Girls How to Turn Their Bright Ideas Into Businesses

The 3rd annual entrepreneurial conference will feature Shark Tank kid CEO Mikaila Ulmer and a diverse panel of judges from Central Texas’ entrepreneurial scene

Mikaila Ulmer, Founder of Me & The Bees Lemonade

Mikaila Ulmer, Founder of Me & The Bees Lemonade

AUSTIN, TX – October 11, 2017 — Austin-based nonprofit Latinitas will be hosting its 3rd annual Startup Chica Conference on October 14, 2017, from 9am to 5pm. Girls of all backgrounds between the ages of 9 and 18 will learn how to come up with innovative ideas to help solve social issues and turn them into products and apps that they will pitch to judges.

Latinitas is honored to have a special keynote speaker that the girls can really relate to: 13-year-old entrepreneur Mikaila Ulmer, Founder and CEO of Me & the Bees Lemonade, which can be found at Whole Foods Market and other natural food stores. “I felt it was very important to be a part of this event because it is an opportunity for me to inspire young girls like myself to dream big and go, with full force, towards their dreams,” said Ulmer. “I am excited to share, learn, grow and inspire!”

The full-day conference will take place on the first floor of Austin’s hub for innovation, Capital Factory (701 Brazos Street, Austin, TX 78701), which has played host to former President Barack Obama and Apple CEO Tim Cook. The girls will spend the day learning how to identify and solve problems, define their market, price and market their products, and present their ideas. The event will close with the girls pitching their ideas to a panel of judges.

Judges include Dr. Mark Sanders, Director of Transportation and Mobility at the Austin Technology Incubator at the IC2 Institute of the University of Texas at Austin; Luis Rodriguez, President & CEO of the Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Nelly Garcia, Co-Founder of Rocheli Patisserie; and Maria Peña, Co-Owner of Donn’s Bar-B-Que, which has several Austin locations.

“Blacks and Latinos have always been entrepreneurial. At Latinitas, we are enlightening young Latinas and other girls to their existing entrepreneurial DNA and will also have a workshop for parents explaining the same because for some families, encouraging their daughters to be entrepreneurial is as risky-sounding as being a writer or an artist. At Startup Chica, we are not only channeling Latina and other girls’ unique points of reference and innovation, but we are aiming to diminish the fears about pursuing an entrepreneur’s life,” said Latinitas Founder and CEO Laura Donnelly.

The $15 cost of attendance includes lunch and materials, and will be waived for all Club Latinitas members. Financial assistance is also available for those who may require it. Parents are invited to attend a workshop in the morning on how to support their child’s entrepreneurial spirit. The event is sponsored by eBay, Bumble, Capital Factory, Wells Fargo, LevelUp Institute, Donn’s BBQ, and the City of Austin’s Economic Development Cultural Arts Division.

More information on the Startup Chica Conference and the link to register can be found at www.startupchica.com.

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About Latinitas

For 15 years, Latinitas, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, has been empowering Latina youth using media and technology, providing direct digital media and technology training and esteem-boosting services to nearly 3,500 girls and teens across Texas annually. Founded by two journalism students fed up with the lack of representation of Latinas in media and technology industries, Latinitas presents enrichment programs at Texas schools, libraries and community centers that use culture as a thread to teach web and graphic design, blogging, video and audio production, photography and of late: video game and app development and coding.

 

About Mikaila Ulmer

When Mikaila Ulmer was just four years old, she was stung by two bees in the same week. Her parents encouraged her to do some research on the bees rather than being upset with them. Upon discovering the important role that bees play in our ecosystem, Mikaila was determined to help them. Using her Great Granny Helen’s flaxseed honey lemonade recipe, Mikaila launched her business from her home in Austin, Texas in 2009. Landing a deal with Daymond John on the show Shark Tank was just the beginning of Me & the Bees’ many business successes. Today, the award-winning lemonade is buzzing off the shelves of Whole Foods Market, Austin Starbucks and natural and organic food stores across the country. At just 12 years old, Mikaila has shared her story with Good Morning America, NBC News, The Real, Forbes and TIME, among others, and has been invited to speak on social entrepreneurship at prestigious gatherings including the White House United State of Women Summit, where she introduced President Barack Obama; Microsoft We Day, alongside Satya Nadella; and the Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Network Summit in South Africa.

Contact: Vicky Garza / 512-900-0304 / vicky@latinitasmagazine.org@latinitasmagazine.org

 

Latinitas is Celebrating 15 Years With a Quinceañera Gala

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Latinitas to Celebrate 15 Years of Tech and Media Education and Girl Empowerment at Quinceañera Gala

AUSTIN, TEXAS (May 22, 2017) – This year, Austin-based Latinitas – the only bilingual and bicultural magazine and digital media and technology nonprofit organization of its kind – will be celebrating its 15th anniversary as many Hispanic girls do – by having a Quinceanera!

Taking place on June 10, 2017, Latinitas’ Quinceañera Gala Presented by Dell EMC will be a modern, chic twist on the Latin American tradition, featuring a choreographed dance, fine photography with a transformation theme for sale, a live and silent auction, tequila tastings and signature cocktails, and cuisine from Mexico’s interior. The Peligrosa-All Star DJs will be performing that night, as well as Stephanie Bergara – lead singer of Selena-cover band Bidi Bidi Banda – and Mayor Steve Adler will be stopping by to say a few words. Colorful cocktail attire and quinceañera dresses are encouraged!

Latinitas will be honoring our “Campeones” – people who have “championed” Latinitas’ mission since its origin through their work and dedication. These honorees include: Producer/Vice President at Troublemaker Studios Elizabeth Avellan; former Austin City Council Member Mike Martinez; Senior Vice President of Univision LA – ATX Luis Patino and his wife Alina; media scholar Dr. Federico Subervi-Velez; and Dell Marketing Director, North America Commercial, Ana Villegas. Quince_Splash_995x600_revised

Latinitas’ signature photography sale at the event welcomes contributions from world-class photographers such as Dulce Pinzon, whose work was featured at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Danielle Villasana, whose long-term project, “A Light Inside” on the life-threatening challenges trans women face throughout Latin America will be featured at the World Press Photo Festival this year.

“We couldn’t have picked a better theme than a quinceañera to celebrate the impact of Latinitas over the past 15 years. Girls transform in Latinitas, they find their voice and a transcendent support system,” said Laura Donnelly, co-founder and CEO. “As an organization, we have reached an exciting precipice of growth that includes stretching our program reach to new spaces – we are that girl who has grown up and is now ready to conquer new frontiers!”

Originated by the Aztecs, the quinceañera was a rite of passage for girls into warrior-hood that has evolved through the century to denote a girl’s transformation into womanhood. At 15 years old, her maturity and growth is acknowledged by her family and other loved ones through a variety of rituals. Although the tradition is not new, quinceañeras are still wildly popular among young girls of Latin American heritage and the parties have become more extravagant over time.

Latinitas’ magazine, still the only publication made for and by young Latinas, was founded in a class at the University of Texas at Austin in 2002 by then-students Alicia Rascon and Laura Donnelly, fed up with the lack and misrepresentation of Latinas in media and technology. The two also developed dozens of no- or low-cost after-school clubs, weekend workshops, camps, and conferences at 112 schools, libraries, public housing sites, and community centers, as well as dozens more in Central and West Texas. Latinitas has provided over 25,000 girls ages nine through 18 with esteem-building lessons in media, technology, and cultural literacy. Latinitas is one of a handful of organizations delivering tech education in a bilingual and bicultural format nationally and the only nonprofit in Austin doing so for 15 years.

Tickets to the Quinceañera Gala are available for purchase at www.LatinitasGala.com. Proceeds will benefit Latinitas’ ongoing programs.  

Contact: Vicky Garza / 512-900-0304 / vicky@latinitasmagazine.org

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ABOUT LATINITAS

Latinitas, an Austin-based nonprofit organization, is dedicated to empowering Latina youth using media and technology, providing direct digital media and technology training and esteem-boosting services to nearly 3,500 girls and teens across Texas annually – 2,000 in Central and 1,500 more in West Texas. Latinitas envisions a future in which all Latinas are strong and confident in their image. Girls and families in Latinitas learn the latest Web 2.0 platforms to design websites, do graphic design, produce video, record audio, blog, do photography, invent social media campaigns, develop video games and mobile apps, coding and robotics ensuring new and diverse voices in media and technology. Latinitas also produces the only magazine of its kind, Latinitasmagazine.org (25,000 monthly viewers), and its own social media network, MyLatinitas.com (1,400 registered girls).

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Latinas Leading the Fight Against Human Trafficking

While Blockbuster films and news media portray human trafficking as a problem that takes place across our oceans, many Latinas are working to shatter that myth and inform Americans that this criminal act exists near their schools and on their playgrounds.

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, more than 300 thousand children – of various ages, genders, classes, races and ethnicities – are trafficked for sex in the United States every year. This figure doesn’t reflect those trafficked for labor or the number of adults also being trafficked within the U.S.

Recognizing this exploitation, Latinas – young and old – are taking a stand against this modern form of slavery.  They are joining forces with other people and organizations to spread awareness, instill programs and laws that prevent trafficking and consul victims of sex slavery.

In Washington D.C., Dr. Carolina De Los Rios is serving as the Director of Client Services for the Polaris Project, a non-profit anti-trafficking organization.

She supervises case managers, social workers and fellows who work directly with victims of human trafficking. Her team provides survivors with counseling, emergency housing and more specialized assistance all intended to help and to rebuild their lives.

“Seeing survivors after you have helped them in an emergency situation is so rewarding,” De Los Rios said. “You’ve seen one of the worst moments of their lives, and then you see them after you and the team worked so hard – smiling, getting their GED, going to college. You see them thriving with their life, and then I know it makes sense what I’m doing.”

Del Los Rios, a Colombian, believes that being a Latina has given her a unique lens in her fight against trafficking.

“Being Latina makes me more aware about the challenges that you experience as a Latina, and it makes me more sensitive to the different challenges that women and girls experience,” Del Los Rios said.

She also said that although all young people are vulnerable to being recruited, Latinas who just immigrated to the U.S., who don’t speak the language and who don’t know how the system works here, may be in an even more vulnerable position.

Public interest attorney Norma Ramos understands that vulnerability firsthand.

The now executive director of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW) was once a child in New York’s foster care system.

“I always felt a strong sensitivity about human beings who are being commercially and sexually exploited,” said Ramos. “I felt that that could have so easily been me – I still feel that way.”

At CATW, the world’s first organization to fight human trafficking internationally, Ramos raises awareness about human trafficking and promotes the Nordic model – laws that penalize the demand for commercial sex and decriminalize victims of the commercial sex industry – as an approach to combat human trafficking.

“When a country passes the Nordic model, I’m very happy,” said Ramos. “Norway passed the Nordic model, then Iceland followed. These were ‘break out the champagne’ moments for me.”

Ramos, who is Puerto Rican, also hopes to encourage young people and Latinas to take a stand against injustice.

“The world has too little political courage; it’s the No. 1 disappointment for me when I see people not risk something in order to change and end a social injustice.”

A few hundred miles east of Ramos is a young Latina in Connecticut whose political courage would make Ramos very proud.

Ana Alarcon is a high school senior and anti-human trafficking advocate.

The 17-year-old Colombian recently traveled to Washington D.C. for the National Youth Summit on Abolition, where she was a panelist alongside human trafficking experts like Wesleyan University professor Lois A. Brown, founder and president of the Frederick Douglass Family Foundation Kenneth Morris Jr., and U.S. Ambassador in the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking Luis CdeBaca.

As a young Latina, Alarcon’s voice and perspective was very unique at the event.

“It feels very empowering as a young person and as a female and as a Latina. There are generally a lot of men in this field,” Alarcon said. “I feel like I could give a voice to different groups, I feel honored, and I feel like I could give other people a sense of ‘you can do this, too.’”

The young Latina hopes to continue her advocacy beyond high school. She was recently accepted into Fordham University, where she will be studying international relations.

“Human trafficking is just a link to so many world issues – poverty, drugs, abuse – it’s all interconnected. If I can stop one thing, it will be a chain reaction to cause peace somewhere else,” Alarcon said.

Like Ramos, Alarcon also wants girls her age to be courageous.

“If you want to do anything, you could absolutely do it. Just because you’re a girl, a minority or you’re young doesn’t mean you can’t do something important or be someone important,” Alarcon said.

If interested in connecting with anti-human trafficking services near you or to obtain free training materials to help you with your advocacy, visit: http://www.polarisproject.org/what-we-do/national-human-trafficking-hotline/the-nhtrc/overview.

 

Quiz: Which Career Fits You?

It is never too early to start thinking about your future.  First of all, congratulations on deciding to think about your education and possible career path.  The following quiz should help you reflect on your talents and abilities. Please don’t over think the questions too much. There is no right answer only an honest one, and  choosing a career should not be that difficult.

 

1) The teacher assigns a group project, and asks for the class to get in to teams you:

A) Stare at your paper, you don’t like these things, you prefer individual work

B) Are very thrilled, you already know who are the team players and called them out before anyone does

C) Look at your friend, and share glances with your other good friends, there is nothing like working but also playing

 

2) When working in a team project you are more likely to be assigned:

A) The research, your team knows how much you enjoy reading and writing and believes this position comes easy for you

B) Team leader, you enjoy being a part of the process and like when you have responsibilities

C) The creativity, you enjoy working with your hands and are a free spirit, people like having you around because of the way you see things

 

3) Your study area can be described as:

A) Very neat, your computer is your study area, portable and reliable

B) An above average desk, followed with a white board for notes and endless supply of postits

C) Flexible, you study where you feel inspired; one day you feel like the park, your bed or the kitchen

 

4) When you need help or need a question answered, you:

A) Google it, the Internet has all the answers

B) Debate it, you feel strongly about issues and to get the most out of a question you feel the need to mention every point possible and make the respondent really think about the answer

C) Feel comfortable asking, you enjoy personal interaction and personal opinions, for you there is no wrong answers only bad listeners

 

5) If your friends could identify you with a TV show character it would be:

A) Alex from Modern Family

B) Robin from How I Met Your Mother

C) Jess from The New Girl

 

Mostly A’s THE SCIENTIST

You are observant and like to think that you have all answers to all questions. You enjoy experiments but appreciate more individual work; you feel that with teamwork people can take credit for your work.  You like to give yourself challenges and you are your worst critic. Even if you are number one in the class, you need to be number one in the school and so on. Friends like having you around because they feel they can understand math or science better when you are around.

People with these personality traits tend to study: Math, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, and Web Development…

 

Mostly B’s THE MANAGER

You are, what your friends would say…bossy, and you love it. You like being in charge, in control but most of all you like responsibility. You enjoy signing up for extra curricular activities, but not always go for just Team Member role. You feel strongly about leadership and believe that you can do something that will change the world one day. Being informed on news and political issues is part of your everyday breakfast. Your friends like having you around because you are determined and make weekend plans a much more efficient thing.

People with these personality traits tend to study: Business, Law, Public Relations, Marketing, Economics…

 

Mostly C’s THE ARTIST

You are a free spirited, you enjoy going with the flow. You like being surrounded with things and people that inspire you. Your friends can describe you as goofy and they know that your choice in clothing can be unpredictable. You seem to have an open mind and are very positive about new things and people. You enjoy working with your hands. You are an enemy to routines and are curious.

People with these personality traits tend to study: Advertising, Photography, Interior Design, Architecture, Fashion…