13-Year-Old Shark Tank Winner to Keynote Startup Chica

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Latinitas’ Startup Chica Conference Aims to Teach Girls How to Turn Their Bright Ideas Into Businesses

The 3rd annual entrepreneurial conference will feature Shark Tank kid CEO Mikaila Ulmer and a diverse panel of judges from Central Texas’ entrepreneurial scene

Mikaila Ulmer, Founder of Me & The Bees Lemonade

Mikaila Ulmer, Founder of Me & The Bees Lemonade

AUSTIN, TX – October 11, 2017 — Austin-based nonprofit Latinitas will be hosting its 3rd annual Startup Chica Conference on October 14, 2017, from 9am to 5pm. Girls of all backgrounds between the ages of 9 and 18 will learn how to come up with innovative ideas to help solve social issues and turn them into products and apps that they will pitch to judges.

Latinitas is honored to have a special keynote speaker that the girls can really relate to: 13-year-old entrepreneur Mikaila Ulmer, Founder and CEO of Me & the Bees Lemonade, which can be found at Whole Foods Market and other natural food stores. “I felt it was very important to be a part of this event because it is an opportunity for me to inspire young girls like myself to dream big and go, with full force, towards their dreams,” said Ulmer. “I am excited to share, learn, grow and inspire!”

The full-day conference will take place on the first floor of Austin’s hub for innovation, Capital Factory (701 Brazos Street, Austin, TX 78701), which has played host to former President Barack Obama and Apple CEO Tim Cook. The girls will spend the day learning how to identify and solve problems, define their market, price and market their products, and present their ideas. The event will close with the girls pitching their ideas to a panel of judges.

Judges include Dr. Mark Sanders, Director of Transportation and Mobility at the Austin Technology Incubator at the IC2 Institute of the University of Texas at Austin; Luis Rodriguez, President & CEO of the Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber of Commerce; Nelly Garcia, Co-Founder of Rocheli Patisserie; and Maria Peña, Co-Owner of Donn’s Bar-B-Que, which has several Austin locations.

“Blacks and Latinos have always been entrepreneurial. At Latinitas, we are enlightening young Latinas and other girls to their existing entrepreneurial DNA and will also have a workshop for parents explaining the same because for some families, encouraging their daughters to be entrepreneurial is as risky-sounding as being a writer or an artist. At Startup Chica, we are not only channeling Latina and other girls’ unique points of reference and innovation, but we are aiming to diminish the fears about pursuing an entrepreneur’s life,” said Latinitas Founder and CEO Laura Donnelly.

The $15 cost of attendance includes lunch and materials, and will be waived for all Club Latinitas members. Financial assistance is also available for those who may require it. Parents are invited to attend a workshop in the morning on how to support their child’s entrepreneurial spirit. The event is sponsored by eBay, Bumble, Capital Factory, Wells Fargo, LevelUp Institute, Donn’s BBQ, and the City of Austin’s Economic Development Cultural Arts Division.

More information on the Startup Chica Conference and the link to register can be found at www.startupchica.com.

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About Latinitas

For 15 years, Latinitas, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, has been empowering Latina youth using media and technology, providing direct digital media and technology training and esteem-boosting services to nearly 3,500 girls and teens across Texas annually. Founded by two journalism students fed up with the lack of representation of Latinas in media and technology industries, Latinitas presents enrichment programs at Texas schools, libraries and community centers that use culture as a thread to teach web and graphic design, blogging, video and audio production, photography and of late: video game and app development and coding.

 

About Mikaila Ulmer

When Mikaila Ulmer was just four years old, she was stung by two bees in the same week. Her parents encouraged her to do some research on the bees rather than being upset with them. Upon discovering the important role that bees play in our ecosystem, Mikaila was determined to help them. Using her Great Granny Helen’s flaxseed honey lemonade recipe, Mikaila launched her business from her home in Austin, Texas in 2009. Landing a deal with Daymond John on the show Shark Tank was just the beginning of Me & the Bees’ many business successes. Today, the award-winning lemonade is buzzing off the shelves of Whole Foods Market, Austin Starbucks and natural and organic food stores across the country. At just 12 years old, Mikaila has shared her story with Good Morning America, NBC News, The Real, Forbes and TIME, among others, and has been invited to speak on social entrepreneurship at prestigious gatherings including the White House United State of Women Summit, where she introduced President Barack Obama; Microsoft We Day, alongside Satya Nadella; and the Dell Women’s Entrepreneur Network Summit in South Africa.

Contact: Vicky Garza / 512-900-0304 / vicky@latinitasmagazine.org@latinitasmagazine.org

 

Latinitas is Celebrating 15 Years With a Quinceañera Gala

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Latinitas to Celebrate 15 Years of Tech and Media Education and Girl Empowerment at Quinceañera Gala

AUSTIN, TEXAS (May 22, 2017) – This year, Austin-based Latinitas – the only bilingual and bicultural magazine and digital media and technology nonprofit organization of its kind – will be celebrating its 15th anniversary as many Hispanic girls do – by having a Quinceanera!

Taking place on June 10, 2017, Latinitas’ Quinceañera Gala Presented by Dell EMC will be a modern, chic twist on the Latin American tradition, featuring a choreographed dance, fine photography with a transformation theme for sale, a live and silent auction, tequila tastings and signature cocktails, and cuisine from Mexico’s interior. The Peligrosa-All Star DJs will be performing that night, as well as Stephanie Bergara – lead singer of Selena-cover band Bidi Bidi Banda – and Mayor Steve Adler will be stopping by to say a few words. Colorful cocktail attire and quinceañera dresses are encouraged!

Latinitas will be honoring our “Campeones” – people who have “championed” Latinitas’ mission since its origin through their work and dedication. These honorees include: Producer/Vice President at Troublemaker Studios Elizabeth Avellan; former Austin City Council Member Mike Martinez; Senior Vice President of Univision LA – ATX Luis Patino and his wife Alina; media scholar Dr. Federico Subervi-Velez; and Dell Marketing Director, North America Commercial, Ana Villegas. Quince_Splash_995x600_revised

Latinitas’ signature photography sale at the event welcomes contributions from world-class photographers such as Dulce Pinzon, whose work was featured at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Danielle Villasana, whose long-term project, “A Light Inside” on the life-threatening challenges trans women face throughout Latin America will be featured at the World Press Photo Festival this year.

“We couldn’t have picked a better theme than a quinceañera to celebrate the impact of Latinitas over the past 15 years. Girls transform in Latinitas, they find their voice and a transcendent support system,” said Laura Donnelly, co-founder and CEO. “As an organization, we have reached an exciting precipice of growth that includes stretching our program reach to new spaces – we are that girl who has grown up and is now ready to conquer new frontiers!”

Originated by the Aztecs, the quinceañera was a rite of passage for girls into warrior-hood that has evolved through the century to denote a girl’s transformation into womanhood. At 15 years old, her maturity and growth is acknowledged by her family and other loved ones through a variety of rituals. Although the tradition is not new, quinceañeras are still wildly popular among young girls of Latin American heritage and the parties have become more extravagant over time.

Latinitas’ magazine, still the only publication made for and by young Latinas, was founded in a class at the University of Texas at Austin in 2002 by then-students Alicia Rascon and Laura Donnelly, fed up with the lack and misrepresentation of Latinas in media and technology. The two also developed dozens of no- or low-cost after-school clubs, weekend workshops, camps, and conferences at 112 schools, libraries, public housing sites, and community centers, as well as dozens more in Central and West Texas. Latinitas has provided over 25,000 girls ages nine through 18 with esteem-building lessons in media, technology, and cultural literacy. Latinitas is one of a handful of organizations delivering tech education in a bilingual and bicultural format nationally and the only nonprofit in Austin doing so for 15 years.

Tickets to the Quinceañera Gala are available for purchase at www.LatinitasGala.com. Proceeds will benefit Latinitas’ ongoing programs.  

Contact: Vicky Garza / 512-900-0304 / vicky@latinitasmagazine.org

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ABOUT LATINITAS

Latinitas, an Austin-based nonprofit organization, is dedicated to empowering Latina youth using media and technology, providing direct digital media and technology training and esteem-boosting services to nearly 3,500 girls and teens across Texas annually – 2,000 in Central and 1,500 more in West Texas. Latinitas envisions a future in which all Latinas are strong and confident in their image. Girls and families in Latinitas learn the latest Web 2.0 platforms to design websites, do graphic design, produce video, record audio, blog, do photography, invent social media campaigns, develop video games and mobile apps, coding and robotics ensuring new and diverse voices in media and technology. Latinitas also produces the only magazine of its kind, Latinitasmagazine.org (25,000 monthly viewers), and its own social media network, MyLatinitas.com (1,400 registered girls).

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Latinitas Announces New El Paso Executive Director Isis Portillo

Latinitas logo

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Latinitas Hires New Executive Director for El Paso Chapter

Native Daughter Isis Portillo will oversee El Paso operations following founder’s departure

Austin/El Paso, Texas (May 1, 2017) – Latinitas, a nonprofit organization focused on empowering young Latinas using media and technology, announced today that Isis Portillo has joined the team as the new executive director in its El Paso office. Portillo will be bringing to the table 19 years of broadcasting experience as well as a background in marketing and advertising.

El Paso Executive Director Isis Portillo

El Paso Executive Director Isis Portillo

A Del Valle High School “Conquistador” and University of Texas at El Paso graduate, Portillo comes to Latinitas after spending the last three years working in IP marketing and consulting for Jack Key Auto Group/HoyFox Automotive. Prior to that, she worked for multimedia conglomerates such as Entravision Communications, Univision Communications and NBC News. As the new executive director at Latinitas El Paso, Portillo will lead new charges in program growth, relationship building and strategies focused on the success of El Paso youth.

“It means giving as many young Latinitas an opportunity to aim higher,” Portillo said about what it means to her to join the Latinitas team. “It’s opening the door for them so that they can do it better. Someone is willing to stand with you so you can get there.” Read more about Portillo on our Medium blog: http://bit.ly/2pqSYZk.

Portillo will be replacing Alicia Rascon as the head of the El Paso chapter of Latinitas. Rascon co-founded Latinitas magazine and outreach programming 15 years ago in at a class at the University of Texas at Austin.  She brought Latinitas programs to El Paso in 2008, providing services to thousands of girls in the city’s school districts, public housing and cultural centers.  Rascon left the organization in January and to join the student engagement and leadership center at the University of Texas at El Paso.

ABOUT LATINITAS

Latinitas is dedicated to empowering Latina youth using media and technology, providing direct digital media and technology training and esteem-boosting services to nearly 3,500 girls and teens across Texas annually – 2,000 in Central and 1,500 more in West Texas. Latinitas envisions a future in which all Latinas are strong and confident in their image. Girls and families in Latinitas learn the latest Web 2.0 platforms to design websites, do graphic design, produce video, record audio, blog, do photography, invent social media campaigns, develop video games and mobile apps, coding and robotics ensuring new and diverse voices in media and technology. Latinitas also produces the first and still only magazine of its kind, Latinitasmagazine.org (25,000 monthly viewers), and its own social media network, MyLatinitas.com (1,400 registered girls).

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Latinitas Announces Design Chica Poster Contest

Latinitas LOGO

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CALL FOR ENTRIES

Latinitas is Requesting Submissions for the Design Chica Poster Redesign Competition

AUSTIN, TX — February 7, 2017 — So you think you can design? Austin-based nonprofit Latinitas is looking for talented graphic designers to redesign the poster for its upcoming Design Chica Conference. Through this competition, the nonprofit is looking to highlight and challenge the diverse talent in the Central Texas area.

Interested contestants must include all of the information that was on the initial poster, a list that can be found on the DesignChica.com website, as well as a photo and short biography of no more than 200 words that introduces the designer and explains what design means to them. All designs must be submitted as a JPG and AI/PSD/Sketch (source/editable file) to austin@latinitasmagazine.org by February 26, 2017.

Eligible graphic designers must reside in Austin or its surrounding areas, and must be at least 16 years old. Top entries will be featured on the Design Chica website. The winner will be announced by March 1 and will receive spotlight recognition in Latinitas’ online magazine and social media channels, and a prize package still to be determined. The winning poster will appear on all Design Chica marketing materials following the contest with design credit given to the designer.

Latinitas’ Design Chica Conference will take place on April 15, 2017 at ACC Eastview, 3401 Webberville Road. The goal of the conference is to introduce girls of all backgrounds to design thinking and to have them work with user experience design professionals to create their very own website. During lunch, girls will meet with local virtual reality experts while experiencing VR demonstrations.

More information about the contest can be found at www.designchica.com/contest.

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About Latinitas

For 14 years, Latinitas, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, has been empowering Latina youth using media and technology, providing direct digital media and technology training and esteem-boosting services to nearly 3,500 girls and teens across Texas annually. Founded by two journalism students fed up with the lack of representation of Latinas in media and technology industries, Latinitas presents enrichment programs at Texas schools, libraries and community centers that use culture as a thread to teach web and graphic design, blogging, video and audio production, photography and of late: video game and app development and coding.

 

Drawbacks of the Curvy Latina Stereotype

With the growing body positivity movement, the “women come in all shapes and sizes” mantra has been voiced both in everyday conversations and in the mainstream media. But with just a glance at Hollywood’s leading ladies, it’s clear that the catchphrase doesn’t apply to Latinas.

The sensual curves of Jennifer Lopez, Sofia Vergara and Salma Hayek have created a curvy, sexy stereotype of Latinas, leaving many who don’t measure up, and even those who do, dissatisfied with their bodies.

“It’s a Latino mystique,” said body image author, teacher and speaker Rosie Molinary. “It has become the storyline for Latinas and creates an incredible pressure whether or not [they] are close to fitting it”.

The voluptuous Latina stereotype has become an ideal among Latina youth. And like all beauty standards, this curvy ideal keeps Latinas paying for products and services that are marketed to help them reach the unattainable ideal.

“The whole point of standards is to keep us as consumers. The more that we feel a level of unrest with our appearance, the more effort we would put into an ideal; and the more effort we put into fitting an ideal, the more we consume,” said Molinary, whose book “Hijas Americanas: Beauty, Body Image, and Growing up Latina” highlights Latina body image in America.

Many people believe that because the curvy ideal celebrates thighs that touch, it must be healthier than the more common white, thin ideal. But according to co-founder of Beauty Redefined, a non-profit that aims to redefine ideas of beauty and health, Lindsay Kite, the curvy ideal affects Latinas just as much as the thin ideal affects their white peers.

“The curvy ideal values thinness just the same, but Latinas have to meet those other ideals too: big behinds and big breasts,” said Kite. “That contributes to eating disorders just as much as the thin ideal does.”

The results of a survey by Self Magazine in partnership with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill show that three out of four American women have disordered eating behaviors.

Latinas have historically been left out of eating disorder research, leaving researchers with the assumption that Latinas and other minorities were less likely to suffer from disordered eating. But recent studies have found that Latinas have eating disorders and body image concerns at rates similar to those of white women.

And according to Kite, women who are closest to the curvy ideal are at the same risk of eating disorders and body dissatisfaction as those Latinas who seem to be the farthest from the ideal.

“Girls and women who are often closest to those ideals are the people who feel the farthest away. They’re the most critical of themselves … because they are valued primarily for their appearance,” said Kite.

That’s why Kite believes it’s important for young girls to surround themselves with positive, less critical people.

She suggests that girls make friends with people who aren’t critical of themselves and other girls’ or women’s bodies and who aren’t preoccupied with their looks.

But not all Latinas are interested in the curvy ideal.

Dana Heymann, 16, has no desire to look like Jennifer Lopez. But the young, slim, fair-skinned, light-eyed Argentine is miffed over the stereotype that tells her she’s not really Latina because she’s not so bootylicious.

“I am full Latina, but I don’t fit the stereotype of curvy or anything, and I don’t really like that stereotype that every Spanish girl has to be curvy because, no, that’s not true,” said Heymann. “It sometimes just slips my mind, and I’m like ‘wait I am Spanish.’ I sometimes think it’s because of the way I look. I’m not tan, I don’t have curly hair, I don’t have the big butt or big boobs.”

Heymann, unfortunately, is not the only young girl questioning the validity of her ethnicity because of the limited representations of Latinas in the media.

When researching for her book, Molinary spoke with a host of Latinas who all felt restricted by the fact that there was just one working Latina for a handful of Latino countries. They hoped for a wide scope of working Latinas who could illustrate to both Latinos and non-Latinos the range of Latina beauty.

Molinary believes that putting Latinos in decision-making positions could help remove the curvy stereotype.

“There’s a significant amount of diversification that needs to take place in Hollywood. On the screen is great, but I would argue that it’s even more important behind the scenes. There needs to be someone to say ‘this is not OK,’” said Monlinary.

Molinary’s call for diversity is important because she believes that young girls must understand that bodies of all shapes, sizes and colors are beautiful.

Here are three strategies Kite believes will help young girls on their path to fighting unreal beauty ideals:

1. Surround yourself with positive people: Our friends and peers can have a big influence on how we feel about our bodies, so try to spend time with people who aren’t critical of themselves or other girls’ and women’s bodies. At the same time, do your best to stop saying negative things about your body out loud. When a friend or family member makes a negative comment about her body, remind her that she’s beautiful. Set a goal with her to recognize when you’re saying negative things, and stop yourself by replacing it with a compliment for yourself or someone else.

2. Go on a media fast: Choose a day, a week, a month or longer to steer clear of as much media as you can. That way, you can see how your life is different without all of those messages and images; and when you return to viewing and reading popular media, you will be more sensitive to the messages that hurt you and those that are unrealistic. Tuning out of media will help girls better recognize what real bodies look like all around them and the wide variety of bodies that are considered attractive and desirable in their own lives.

3. Be critical of the media, not yourselves or others: We need to feel an obligation to put media under closer inspection for the influence it has in our lives. Next time you are flipping through a magazine or watching a movie, train yourself to ask important questions about what you see. If you don’t like the answers you find, remember you can turn away from the messages that hurt you. Ask yourself:

  • Do you feel better or worse about yourself when viewing or hearing this media? Do you believe the females in your life would feel better or worse about themselves after viewing or hearing this media?
  • Who is advertising in these pages or on this screen? (Look for ads and commercials, and you’ll see who is paying the bills for your favorite media messages)
  • Who owns the TV show, movie, magazine, video game or website you are viewing? (Research the company and its owners and you’ll find out who the powerful decision-makers are behind the scenes of your media of choice)
  • Is the media you read and view promoting real health or impossible ideals meant to make you spend money and time? Who are those messages promoting impossible ideals usually speaking to?
  • How are women and girls presented here? Are they valued for their talents and personality? Do they look like the females in your life? Which body types are presented as beautiful or desirable?

Career Spotlight: Medical Professional

From la pisca, manual labor to a successful PhD in Nurse Practice, Beatriz Bautista is an exemplary role model, not just for Latinas, but to all women.

Can you tell us more about your background?

I’m from Edinburg, TX but spent most of my childhood in Idaho. My grandparents came to this country thanks to the Bracero Movement, and I grew up with them picking seasonal crops, such as onions, apples and cherries.

What was your childhood like?

(smiles while reminiscing) I remember at 16 years old, besides going to school, I was driving those big trucks that have all of the apples and crops.

Having no background in the medical field, what made you choose this career?

Yes, I am a first generation student and I had no idea what I wanted to be. I wanted to help sick people. I was hungry for knowledge. I came to understand and told myself if you want something you have to work for it.

When I graduated high school, my grades weren’t the best, but then I enrolled in University and learned that if you work hard for your grades, school becomes easier and easier. I first enrolled in a Gen Ed, program because I was undecided, then I knew what my vocation was.
Who is your personal role model?
My tia, she is a LVN, licensed vocational nurse, and worked as a public health nurse. She also did medical translations; she was one of the few Latinas in the medical field in Idaho that spoke Spanish. I appreciated how solicited she was, being bilingual made her worth for 2.

Has being latina and a woman ever been an obstacle for you?

For me being a latina is something you wear proud, you have the gift of diversity. Knowing two languages makes you worth for 2. Latinas are known for loyalty and their charisma, as well as nurturing and sensitive individuals, once you know how to appreciate your culture it should make you fearless and stoppable.

Do you have any advice for young girls who are interested in the medical field?

Work on your GPA, if you have good grades a lot of doors will open, not to mention the endless opportunities that are available; scholarships, work-study. If you struggle with science, biology and math, my suggestion is to get tom know your teacher better. They are there to help you, especially if you show an interest or curiosity for the medical field.

There are also programs that offer help and guidance in the field, such as HOSA and Med-Ed, you can also volunteer at a hospital.
Hispanic parents, especially if you are a first generation student like myself, may not value education as much and want their kids to be working right away. I tell you, YOU CAN DO BOTH! Through out my education I was always working, I paid for my studies; there was a point in my life where I was 3 professions: a nurse, a student and a mother. Don’t loose focus, and you will find success. A lot of Latinas come from households where the parents do not understand how important an education is.

Do you have a personal story or anecdote that you would like to share with our readers?

When I was accepted in University, I was afraid. I felt a lot of responsibility, being the first person in my family to go to University. My grandfather has always believed in me, which also made me nervous and afraid to fail and let him down. But at the same time it made me stronger and fearless. I needed to prove myself that I could do it. After I got my first A in college, everything else seemed to make sense and I started getting more and more As. I think it helped that I was always hungry for knowledge; I was passionate about what I was doing.

You have been awarded Nurse Practitioner of the Year and now hold a PhD, what is next?

I want to get my Menopause Certification, NCMP, specialize in this hormonal change that a lot of Latinas and just women in general do not understand. I want to be there for them during these hard times, and help them understand what they are going through and get through it better.

 

Dr.Bettyis available for mentoring and to answer any questions you may have on the field.

 

Please contact the author to get in touch with Dr.Bautista.

Traditional Dating

There are common stereotypes that Mexican families have strong conservative traditions when it comes to dating. One common stereotype is dating within one’s culture.

It may have been like this a long time ago specifically for our grandparents and great-grandparents during a time where things were more traditional, and the world wasn’t so modern.  As a 22 year-old Latina I can say first hand that things have changed tremendously, at least for my family. Times have changed and my parents have coped with things they were not used to when they were my age. I constantly hear from my parents how strict it was when they were growing up.

When love and culture clash:
It all comes down to your family, and how easy they are on coping with traditional change. If a family is really close to their rural Mexican roots, they will have their own set of customs such as going out in a group, instead of alone with the date. For example, in Mexico, one common expectation is getting the father’s approval since he is the head of the household. For women, the guidelines are more strict because the father is letting their little girl  go off with another man.

Debora Hernandez, a senior at the University of California, Riverside stated, “As an individual you always want to please your parents and make them proud, but I have always been very independent and moved to the beat of my own drum.”

Victoria Servin, an editorial-translator intern for Latinitas and Linguistics and Translation student at the University of Texas at El Paso, explains how she followed her mother’s wishes, “Personally I didn’t want a boyfriend in high school so it didn’t really bother me too much. I never really felt the need to rebel against my parents and I didn’t do it out of spite, I guess I just agreed.”

In Mexico, your family is your biggest dating pressure.

Essentially, you are not only dating the man/woman, but you are dating the family; almost becoming part of the family in which they expect you to hold conservative values. Another common conception is that girls are not officially allowed to date until they turn 15, the age they become a woman and have the option to have a quinceañera.

When asked about dating in high school at a young age, Victoria Servin stated, “My mother didn’t want me to have a boyfriends because she didn’t want me to fall under the hispanic teen pregnancy statistic. She wanted me to go to school, or travel, she didn’t want me to date anyone.”

Today the Mexican-American culture is really not much different from other cultures in the U.S. Like all concerned parents, my parents did have some influence over who I dated. They wanted to meet them and learn more about them, rather than “I’m going out with so and so.” And questions most parents ask, “Where did you meet him?” “What does he study?” “How old is he?” etc.

On the other hand, some parents are less eager to want to meet every person their daughter dates.  Servin comments, “Most mexican moms want to know who you go out with, my mom doesn’t want to meet anyone; I think it’s because no matter who I date, it’s not going to be good enough.”

Today, women are also seen as more independent and as  the breadwinners of the house. Melissa Garcia, a graduate from the University of California, Riverside states, “I think my parents main concern is that I date someone that can support me, but as a 2012 Latina, that is not needed anymore. I think I am capable of fending for myself.”

We all have different experiences especially since we all come from different backgrounds. What are yours?

Music Review: Jessy J’s ‘Hot Sauce’

Jessica Spinella, also known as Jessy J, is an emerging Latina musician.

Her father is from Mexico and her mother is from Texas. She began playing the piano and the saxophone at a very young age and went on to studying jazz at the University of Southern California. After graduating, she toured with artists such as Michael Bublé.

‘Hot Sauce’ is her third album, which displays more of a Latino vibe. Paul Brown, a smooth jazz legend, is the producer for the majority of the album. Together, they blend several sounds and rhythms, creating an electric performance. The album also features several musicians such as Joe Sample, Harvey Mason and Gregg Karukas.

‘Remember The Night’ is the first track on the album and it showcases Jessy J playing the saxophone. It is an upbeat track that transports you to the streets of Latin America. Tracks such as ‘Hot Sauce’ make you connect to Jessy J’s Latin roots, and the salsa feeling that compliments it gives you an urge to dance. There are certain tracks that have a slower beat, such as ‘Rio Grande.’ It starts out with smooth sounds and harmonizes between two saxophones.

This album is full of great smooth jazz. For those who prefer some sort of vocals, have a listen to ‘In A Sentimental Mood.’ With Saunders Sermon on vocals, this song is fascinating and extremely catchy. If you have never been a fan of jazz, give this album a chance; you might change your mind. It’s a great album to have on your iPod, and Jessy J is a musician to keep an eye on.