Latina Activists: Huerta, Sor Juana and Anzaldúa

Learn more about these Latina activists:

Dolores Huerta

Huerta is a labor leader and civil rights activist who was an early member of the National Farmworkers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers (UFW). Huerta was the daughter of Juan Fernandez, a miner, farmer worker, union activist, and state assemblyman, and Alicia Chavez. Chavez raised Huerta and her two brothers in the central California farm worker community of Stockton, California. Huerta’s mother was known for her kindness and compassion towards others and was active in community affairs, numerous civic organizations, and the church.

Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz

She was a self-taught scholar and poet of the Baroque school, and was known in her lifetime as “The Tenth Muse.” Juana was a devoutly religious child who often hid in the hacienda chapel to read her grandfather’s books from the adjoining library, something forbidden to girls. She learned how to read and write Latin at the age of three.Sor Juana is considered today as a Mexican writer and a contributor to the Spanish Golden Age. Her famous poema is “hombres necios que acusan a la mujer sin razon.”

Gloria Anzaldúa

She was a scholar of Chicana cultural theory and feminist theory. Anzaldúa was born in the Rio Grande Valley of south Texas. Gloria Anzaldúa’s great-grandfather, Mr. Urbano, was the first owner of the Jesús María Ranch in which she was born. Her mother grew up in an adjoining ranch, Los Vergeles, which was owned by her family. She met and married Urbano Anzaldúa when both were very young. Anzaldúa was a descendant of many of the prominent Spanish explorers and settlers to come to the Americas in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as of indigenous descent.

Speak Your Mind