Dreams On Pointe

© BE Studio Inc 2013For many girls, attending dance is a great way to have fun or to participate in an exciting form of exercise. For others, it is the passion that pushes them to the edge of exhaustion and then some, in order to be the graceful figure on stage. Becoming a professional dancer is something that has most likely crossed the minds of many young girls, but those who wish to pursue it as a serious career will find that it takes far more than attending the occasional class.

What many dancers do not realize is that reaching the professional level takes more than joining the dance team at school.  It takes sacrifice and a large amount of one’s time and dedication to the dance studio. The life of a dancer who wishes to pursue the role of a professional revolves around being healthy and maintaining stamina- all while pushing yourself to be better and stronger everyday. This pursuit is no different than becoming a professional athlete and requires the same amount of serious dedication.

Making it in this Industry

Careers in dance are not for the faint of heart, nor those who cannot stand a bit of strong-willed perseverance. From the perspective of a dance student who now teaches at the studio she established after working with a pre-professional company, Jessica Zamarripa, a native of Laredo, Texas and founder and creative director of Laredo School of Contemporary Dance says, “I have had a lot of students come and go… [because] dance requires a lot of time. It requires a lot of sacrifice… even now as a dance teacher, I have to sacrifice my personal life. But I have no regrets, it’s all going to be worth it.”  After dancing with pre-professional contemporary dance company Ballet East of Austin, Texas, Zamarripa established Laredo School of Contemporary Dance to fill the need for a pre-professional dance industry in Laredo

Jessica

On her thoughts about what it takes to make it in the industry: “You need to have the heart to be in this field. It does not matter if you have the natural ability alone, the other part is your willingness to work through the monotony of countless rehearsals and repetitions.”

Careers in dance start and end in youth. The earlier you train, the better the chance of improvement and the more things you retain over time. Once you figure out dance is the career for you, the hours spent at the dance studio become something to look forward to, no matter the price- and this price will be your hard work and dedication. According to Zamarripa, those who seek immediate results “belong in the audience, watching dance.”

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