DIY – Emoji Jar

PicsArt

written by Ana-Paola Perez

This Jar is perfect for a gift to give a friend,or even for yourself! All you need is a small jar, yellow paint, sharpies (color depends on the emoji you want to make), a paint brush, and a stencil of the emoji you’d like to make.

  1. You can start by adding paint to the inside of the jar. You can either move the paint inside by simply moving and rotating the paint. You can also just use a paint brush to speed up the process.
  2. Then, use a stencil to make the face. To make the stencil just print or trace the emoji and cut out the eyes, mouth and accessories.
  3. Tape the stencil to the jar and begin coloring inside the stencil with the sharpies.
  4. When the stencil is removed you can clean the edges by lining it.
  5.  When the yellow paint is dry you can put anything inside like pencils, pens, scissors, make up brushes, money or change, or even flowers for decor. It’s super easy and fun to make.

Maximizing Your Summer Staycation

Summer vacation as a college student is quite different from summer vacation in grade school. It suddenly becomes taboo to spend your summer days waking up late, watching cartoons, and just goofing around. In college, the generic “have a great summer” yearbook greeting gives way to a slightly different email signoff: “Have a productive summer.” Your classmates may be blowing up your social media with posts about their summer internships in a big city, or with photos of foreign countries where they are studying abroad. If you, instead, find yourself back in your hometown for the summer, don’t fret. You will still have plenty of time and opportunities to experience a new place and to go off on your own adventures. Until then, here are five ways for you to make the most of your summer staycation!

1.       Free Summer Events

 The warm weather offers a perfect opportunity for cities to put on a myriad of outdoor public events. The best part is, they’re usually free! (Or, at least very affordable.) Be on the lookout in your local newspaper for outdoor screenings, concerts, or farmer’s markets. “There are a ton of great activities to take advantage of,” says Brittany Ochoa, a junior at Texas A&M University, spending the summer in her hometown of El Paso, TX. “I’ve gone to a few movies in the park, and the Let Freedom Ring concert series is always a go-to weekend outing for me.” While food and drinks will cost extra, you can always bring your own snack and just go for the show.

2.       Explore Your City

           Cities and towns are not static. They are always growing and changing. If you spend most of your year away at school, then chances are that not everything stayed the same while you were gone. Exercise that newfound independence of yours to explore your city. Grab a friend and venture out. Try a restaurant in a neighborhood that you never go to. Investigate what goes on in that building that has always caught your eye, but that you have always wondered about. This is the place of your origin story, learn more about it, and you might learn something about yourself along the way.

3.       Personal Project

 We all have that secret little book of ideas, whether it’s written on actual paper, or just kept in the back of your mind. You go off to college in hopes of pursuing your passions, but you don’t always get the opportunity to actually spend time practicing them. School, work, friends are all important and all worthwhile things to devote your time, but they can also get in the way of reading that book that’s been sitting on your shelf, or playing out that melody that’s been in your head. You are approaching a chapter in your life that is void of any free time, let alone a whole season full of it. Turn your attention for the next few months to a personal project. It can be anything you want, as long as it fulfills you.

For Ochoa, that project includes “experimenting with watercolors and photography,” which she posts on her own blog. Amanda Chacon, also an El Paso native and a junior at University of Texas at San Antonio, expresses a similar sentiment, claiming that “being home and not having classes to attend has also freed up a lot of my time for recreational activities that I typically don’t have the chance to participate in throughout the semester. I’ve gone climbing a lot more while at home, and even went skydiving a few weeks ago!” You don’t have to be as daring as Amanda, but definitely don’t be afraid to try your hand at something new. This is the perfect time! 

4.       Bond with Family and Friends

It’s called a hometown for a reason. You could be anywhere else right now, but you are here because this is where your family is. This is likely the place where you grew up, where you went to school, where you met some of your closest friends. Going off to school wasn’t just an adjustment for you, it was also an adjustment for your family. Spending time with them, and with your old friends, means catching up on all the little stories that you missed while you were away and sharing the exciting new things that you have learned and experiences while you were at college. Just a fair warning: bonding with your fam could result in increased homesickness when you ship out again in the fall, but it’s totally worth reconnecting to your culture and to your support system. 

5.       Reset

 Like the exhausted laptop that you leave powered on every second of every day, sometimes you just need to reset. Now is your chance to take a breather between semesters. You know those eight-hour nights of sleep that you’re always hearing about? Now you can actually see what the big fuss is about. Without those ghastly 8 am classes or late-night study sessions, you can actually get a decent amount of sleep at night (so don’t sabotage yourself by watching Netflix until dawn.) It’s also okay to take a day every now and then to do nothing. Remember: taking care of yourself is just as important as taking care of business.

Father’s Day Poem

Ability to negotiate
Unreachable capacity to listen
Stumble, smart, and noble character
Who has proposed to himself to be my father

From before I was born you were already thinking of me
My steps, my laughs, my falls
Made themselves onto their way on your childish mind
Your teen and adult mind

Your sleepless nights, thoughts and experiences,
Had a descendant
Happy to join you on your days
As a priority and your personal strength

Counting on your experiences,
You went traveling through the whole world
Thinking about how can you make it better
For my arrival and for my roar

Once the day came
Of my inconvenient wish
Of going out, of meeting, of seeing
You were still traveling the world
Running through buildings, hospitals and halls for you to see me

Such wishes, such omens
They materialized in your head
And they projected them in me, your daughter

I cannot remember your excitement
But I can listen to you talking about it
About the moment in which you hold me in your arms
And you cried

The moment in which you feed me
And you couldn’t stop smiling
The moment that I learned how to use the restroom
And you gave thanks

You taught me how to talk
How to use my tongue and pronounce
Words and promises to communicate
To you, mi “pá”

You taught me about family reunion
How to salute, how to give thanks, and how to say goodbye
To not talk back to elders but to learn from them
Thanks to you, my judge

You taught me how to ride a bike
To move my legs at my own rhythm
And forget about the scrapes, falls and cries
Because of you, my heroe

You taught me how to play chess
To think about strategies, to decide attacks
And not let myself give up because of someone else
Because you never do that, my tactician

You taught me about books and lecture
To became interested for the footprints of our ancestors
Writings, encyclicals, and poems
For my intellect that I owe to you, my librarian

You taught me how to sing
To experiment in me the sensation
Of cautivating a closet, a living room, an audience
With your help, my mentor

You taught me to work for what I want
To listen enough
To follow what I pose,
Because you make it possible, my pleader

You taught me how to play the guitar
Musical notes, songs, and hearing technique
Got an entrance to my life
Because of you, my artist

But more than anything
You taught me to think and to love
To make my own mistakes and to not follow them
To laugh, to cry, to confront oneself

To build memories like the ones you build for yourself
To wish, to contemplate, to believe
In the depths of my self

Thank you for believing in me
Even before my existence and
Thank you for thinking of me
Even before your adolescence

Congratulations on this day that celebrates
Your persona, your entity, and your charisma
As a father, who you always have been.
Thank you for being my greatest inspiration.

DIY Grad Gift: Succulent Painted Tin Can

tin can

What’s something that graduates love to get on their special day? Flowers! But this time, try something different than the usual roses. Succulents. Lately, these little plants have been taking over desks, offices, bedroom, living rooms you name it! And no wonder, since these plants are so easy to take care, last longer than roses, and are super affordable! Now, imagine adding a simple touch with a beautiful tin can for a pot.

Supplies:

  •  A succulent of your choice; they can be found in the gardening aisle of Wal-Mart, Lowes, or Home Depot.
  •  Spray paint of your choice
  •  Succulent potting soil
  •  Rocks
  •  Tin can larger enough for the succulent
  1. First you will begin with the tin can pot. Spray paint the tin can in the color of your choice. Hint: try to paint it to the color scheme of your graduate’s dorm room or her favorite color!
  2. After you painted your can, let it dry for an hour or so until it’s completely dry. Once it’s dry it will be time for the repotting.
  3. Grab your “pot” and fill it with a layer of small pebbles/rocks. Trust me, if you don’t add rocks then the succulent will not live long.
  4. Then, fill the pot with a little bit of succulent potting soil and grab the succulent from its original pot and place it in the pot.
  5. Place more soil in the can, pat down and tighten the soil around the succulent.
  6. Now, add a layer of rocks and there you go!

You can make one or more succulents; they’re inexpensive to make, and can even double as a graduation/dorm decor gift.

18 Things to Do Before You Turn 18

10974162_390886677749379_2469496210793465877_oAdulthood is relative, some people have to grow up very young and start to have many responsibilities as a 40 year old person. And some of us are really lucky and we get our time to adapt to this new stage of our life. If you’re like me and you’re about to finish high school and haven’t started working or going to college, or if you really know how to manage your time, you need to do these 18 things before you get all caught up in the new things that will come to your life.

1. Go on a road trip with your best friends

This is something that you really should do, a road trip is an amazing experience that you need to do at least once. With this experience you’ll learn how awesome it is to travel with the people you love (outside your family), probably get to see so many different places and observe things in a way that you haven’t done before, and will be able to things that you don’t normally do.

2. Go camping and sleep under the stars

Whether you would like to do this alone or with someone else, camping sets you free. You get a day/night without technology and a place to appreciate what nature has given you.

3. Eat exotic food

Eat food from another country, as I read on the internet “food that you don’t know how to pronounce.” Even if it’s some simple drink to a fancy dish or a weird combination of food. Trying new food makes you aware that not everything in the world is the same. Not everyone shares the same food traditions and recipes. Even if you don’t like the food, you’ll get a good story about how the food gave you food poisoning or it was so spicy that your mouth felt like it was on fire.

4. Go to a music festival

The energy and the intensity of going to a music festival is indescribable; you see all kinds of people, outfits, music and everything! You get to meet new people and listen to great music. Music festivals are an amazing experience because of the different environment.

5. Make new goals

This is the time to set new goals for your future, whether these goals are academic, financial, of relationships or self improvement; being open to change and to accomplish new things says that this person is not stuck on the same and wants to become someone better. Life is about this, always moving forward and trying to do something good with our existence.

6. Learn to play an instrument

Taking the time and patience to learn how to play a new instrument will give you some tools to take advantage in the future; playing an instrument is not just because you want a future in the music industry, it can be as a stress reliever, it increases your memory capacity, enhances your coordination and it’s something you can do when you’re bored!

7. Learn the basics of a new language

Or learn a new language! This will not only help you when you’re trying to get a job, because it looks good on a resumé, this also helps you for when you get the chance to get out of the country and you can communicate better with the people living on it. Learning a new language is really fun and it gives an opportunity to explore another culture.

8. Do nothing for a whole day

Yes, even if this sounds silly and really easy to do, your mind and body will appreciate this because you get the most amazing day to rest and to enjoy doing nothing; just watch a movie or TV show marathon, play video games all day long or just sleep for 24 hours. Because once you grow up, you won’t get as many lazy days as you used to.

9. Do Something Nice For A Stranger

Buy food for a homeless person, give out money to charity, smile to people, hold the door for someone, give a compliment, whatever it’s fine! These actions can change someone’s day or even their lives! Doing something good for someone can be pleasing for you as well!

10. Start to work out

I know it’s not like a fantastic thing to do before you hit the 20s but this will do great things to your body and mind. Staying healthy and in good shape gives you a better life quality and probably add years to your life and of course, it boosts up your confidence.

11. Make a new friend

Making friendships is really important, that bond is so different and unique and at this age (and at every other age) we need someone to share our best and worst moments with. Someone new to have inside jokes with, someone to laugh and cry at the same time, someone to tell your life story to — who knows, they might even become your best friend. Making new friends doesn’t stop in high school.

12. Get a makeover

Reinvent yourself, do something good for you and/or for your image. Change is always good and giving yourself a change will make you feel different. Want to try that cute new hairstyle? Do it!

13. Learn about your heritage/ family history.

Ask your grandparents/ great grandparents about your family, any good things or events that marked your family, or just listen to them and their stories. They have so much to share with you, pay attention to them and they’ll open up to you.

14. Volunteer on a non profit 

Join an organization that does something good for the community, besides doing your good deeds, it’s a good way to spend your time and energy because it’s a positive thing to do for you and others. Plus, you get to meet new people and retrieve a little of what life has given to you.

15. Make a scrapbook of all the special moments that you had

Take pictures, write something on them, keep your movie/concert tickets and special things and paste them in a scrapbook. Or save a shoe box or cookies box with memorable items. Years later you’ll look back at it and be thankful that you kept all of those things.

16. Start a journal

Write every day; a simple verse, a meaningful quote, anything! Write something that happened to you that day and keep writing every day. It doesn’t matter if it’s something short, at the end of the journal/ year read a few pages and see how much you’ve changed.

17. Ride a “dangerous” roller coaster

Not dangerous “Final Destination” type; a super big/tall roller coaster that you may be afraid of. Those that make your stomach twist; get on one and defeat the fear of heights and feel the adrenaline. Plus, you’ll have a cool story to tell to your friends/ family.

18. Write a letter to your future self

Write the things you want to tell your future-you; what you expect of her and things you are sure you’ve already accomplished. Tell her that you need to be happy and achieve everything you want in life, tell her silly things about her that she surely doesn’t remember and needs to; some memories, weird habits, and even a photo! Open that letter in 5-10 years and see what has come true and what has changed about you.

Step out of your comfort zone! Even if you don’t plan to do any of these 18 points, do something that you think is fun or different. Your future-self will look back and thank you for taking risks and having fun.

The Wonders of Quotev

written by Angie Flores

With so many people using the internet daily, it is not uncommon to see multiple social media web pages, such as Facebook or Twitter, with millions of users logging in and constantly stating updated/connected with friends. But digging away from the commonly known social media sites, there is one peculiar page with a whole world of its own. Quotev, or formerly known as Quizzaz, is a webpage focused mainly on the creativity of thousands of users across the world. Containing a variety of stories, quizzes, groups and such, all done by regular people, Quotev can be considered an online paradise. Mostly popular among teenagers, Quotev is growing quickly.

While most pages like Wattpad and Miss Literati offer writing services, Quotev is a whole place of its own. It also offers the opportunity to speak with artists around the world. It is recognized that Quotev does not usually contain material known by the majority of teenagers nowadays. The page is a getaway to roam free for every fangirl/fanboy to happily be dedicated to their idols/fandoms/etc. Some ways users show their love and passion to their likes are by writing fanfiction (which is a large amount of the writing content), starting groups (multiple groups can including role playing), and making quizzes (such as seeing whether you are a “true fan” of a certain topic).

“I think the best part about Quotev would have to be the writing,” Maggie Gordon, 14, shares.

Quotev users are also able to customize their profiles like any other social media account — except with more freedom than the usual. Quotev is sometimes referred to as “the place where all those who don’t fit come together.” Multiple users have even mentioned that speaking to the people they have met through the page saved their lives. While most pages like Instagram are focused on seeing what “real-life” friends are up to, Quotev gives a revolutionary twist to friendship by creating online friendships.

“Quotev is my life. Literally, “Lena Quinn, 18, adds.

“In these two years I’ve been here, I’ve met so many amazing friends, made great memories. This webpage  changed my way of living, in a great way.”

Gordon has a similar experience with Quotev.

“The people online are so friendly. Plus the stories are amazing! I think lots of them should actually be published,” she adds.

While many doubt online friendships, this site has been overwhelmingly positive.

“Once I showed my parents [the page]… they were angry,” adds Quinn.

“I get that they don’t trust anyone online, but I know these are my friends. It’s sad that I cherish these people more than the ones in reality, but I know it was meant to be. Different timezones don’t define friendship,” she shares.

Quotev is packed with multiple caring people, or so Quinn narrates: “I’ve talked to my followers on Skype, I have some of their numbers and Kik [accounts]. They’re just my sweethearts. If I ever put an RA (which stands for Recent Activity, aka a post) about me feeling down, they’re right there to help me to my feet. I couldn’t go through anything without them.”

Gordon supported this case by commenting how has made a couple of friends.

“They’re great! I never saw how great Quotev would be coming,” she adds.

But Quotev is not always sunshine and rainbows. The page, unfortunately, has had some cases of bullying. Most of the cases involve some of the popular accounts. In addition, some users have experienced hacking and spam accounts. One can assume that this stems from the site’s increase in popularity, but, aside from these bad experiences, it still continues to be a positive experience for many teens.

But at the end, flaw after flaw, Quotev.com will forever be the home of thousands of people across the planet “Quotev is my everything” Quinn happily concludes. “I can’t imagine life without it.”

¿Quien Soy Yo? / Who Am I?

AriadneThere are many things that shape who you are, your identity. For me, it deals with my name, nationality, roots, and family history. They have shaped me who I am today, but it hasn’t always been easy. So, who am I? My name is Ariadne and I am 24 years old. This is my story.

Some say your identity starts with your name. For me, it’s a more personal story. The first time my dad saw me he wanted me to have an original name. The origin of it is Greek and it belonged to a princess who protected the entrance of the infamous Minotaur’s cave. I know most of my professors don’t really know how to pronounce my name and I deal with it every time I get to know someone new. I like my name, don’t get me wrong, but I wouldn’t be mad if I had an easier one. My name shapes who I am, but so do a lot of things.

Finding Strength through my Roots
For the most part of my life, I have attended only Mexican schools. I consider myself a Mexican, even if I was born in El Paso, Texas. My parents and brothers were born in Ciudad Juárez, and, for that reason, my roots are stronger than my nationality. As I said, both of my parents were born in Ciudad  Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico.  My maternal grandmother was the daughter of a Spanish colonist who settled in Parral, Chihuahua then later came to Ciudad Juárez to have a  better life.  Mama Quecha, what she likes to be called, is the “patriarca” of my mother’s family. Mama Quecha  was married to my Papa Grande, whose father fought in the Mexican Revolution.

I have Spanish roots from my grandmother, and I must say that I am the only red head with curly hair in the entire family — which I love. My grand-grandfather was a red head with white skin among the indigenas. When my  abuelita had nine sons, one of them came out a red head with blue eyes, too. My dad’s  family also has some Spanish roots, too, but those roots are not as strong as my mother’s family. My Spanish roots shape my physical appearance and are a part of my identity, but who I am comes from living in a U.S.-Mexico border city and relationship with my family.

Living in a U.S.-Mexico Border City
I had difficulty adjusting to the environment of both cities (El Paso, Texas and Ciudad, Juárez) because the people were so different from one another. My dad used to tell me that he didn’t want me to be like a chicana. I didn’t understand why, but I thought that it was something bad. My dad referred to them as  stuck up women covered with tattoos. During my first two years of college, I was able to meet and learn more about the Chicano culture. The Chicanas were so different and nothing like my dad had described them. The Chicanas helped me be confident and not scared of college. Now, I’m a junior majoring in Multimedia Journalism and close to getting my degree.

Even though I wasn’t born in Mexico, my culture and roots come from there. I feel very proud to say I’m Mexican and I’m not scared of my beautiful Ciudad Juárez. I have a lot to be thankful to that city, and I’m not ashamed to say where I come from. I grew up and lived there, I have friends and I even prefer to have fun in my beloved Ciudad Juárez. I’m happy to know that my family has a rich diversity and history in Mexico, but both Mexico and the city of El Paso has helped shape who I am.

Literature Picks for Spring Break

For book lovers, it might seem that there are endless lists of books to read, but we’ve stumbled across a couple of selections that you might pick up during your Spring Break vacation.

In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez
This historical book is about the famous Mirabal sisters who lived in the Dominican Republic and defied the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo. The story follows the lives of the sisters from young girls to marriage, womanhood, motherhood, and to their incarceration. This is a must-read as it recounts a heartbreaking story of Latina woman who fought for freedom in their country during a time when women were expected to be obedient, let alone not meddle in politics. The work of Alvarez makes the reader feel the oppression and fear that Dominicans felt during Trujillo’s regime, while trying to live their lives as normally as possible. This book has been adapted to movie starring Salma Hayek.

The Selection by Kiera Cass
While the story might not center around the Latino community, this author is Puerto Rican who has found immense popularity in the literature realm. The Selection is the first part out of a 4-book saga; it follows the main protagonist, America Singer, who has been forced to enter competition called the Selection in order to compete against 34 girls to win the heart of the future king of Illéa. Unlike the other girls, America finds that being selection is a nightmare as she didn’t want to leave her home and her previous Love to live in a mansion where chaos and violence are constant companion. This book meets The Bachelor and the Hunger Games. The Selection is a must-read as it is important to support Latina authors in the book world where it is difficult to find books that have Latino protagonists or even written by Latinos.

Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older
Shadowshaper is the story with an Afro-Latina protagonist. This book is for those who are looking for a young adult fiction book that has magic and fantasy elements. Sierra Santiago is a young artist living in Brooklyn when at a party a zombielike creature crashes her world. Through this conundrum, Sierra discovers that her world around her consists of magic and that it exists in her ancestry.  Older’s book is a refreshing take on the female protagonist as she is not only strong but has a positive mentality of her body, which will pass onto the reader. There is romance incorporated into this book but it is not the main focus nor the goal for the protagonist.

Dealing with Family Problems

Hispanic girk looking sadFamilies are those whom we can rely on for support, for love and those whom we have a special bond with, but we don’t always choose to embrace our feelings towards one another.

According to Psychology Today, it is common to have family problems, especially when living with several teenagers at home with their parents. Some of these issues include alcoholism, abuse, feelings of guilt, depression, financial, and anger towards family members.

The Better Health Channel shares three tips on how to overcome these common problems that can be sometimes be too hard to deal with.

1. Communication
Even though it is a cliché when someone says “Communication is key,”  it is true. “A lot of the times, unwanted problems arise because we don’t talk to each other enough. If we could communicate more with one another, we wouldn’t have to deal with the extra stress of unnecessary problems,” says Bianca, 24. Talking might sometimes be difficult, especially when it is something that is bothering you, but even a small amount of communication goes a long way. Keep in mind that the idea is to resolve the conflict, not win the argument.

2. Listen
Try to stay calm by putting your emotions aside and don’t interrupt the other person while they are speaking. Sometimes we are too stubborn to realize that we are letting our pride get in the way of fixing our problems. Understanding what they are saying by asking questions through an open and honest discussion will be beneficial in the long run.

3. Seek Help
If it is a more serious problem where communication is not possible, seek professional help. “When I was going through some intense family problems, I didn’t know what to do. I decided to go to my school counselor and talk about it, it took a lot for me to go, but I couldn’t deal with it alone. And now I can talk to my family about it and things are slowly getting better,” says Mary, 19.

Whether it’s talking with your family or with a counselor, you are not alone. You don’t have to deal with your family problems by yourself. Millions of people are dealing with the same things you are. Communication is key, listen to your heart, and seek for what you need.

“My family and I don’t have a good communication environment. My parents are old school and they think their way is the right way. And there’s no way of  telling them otherwise. I was so fed up and tired with everything that I decided to take it into my own hands. I made my parents listen to me. I made them see how much stress and pain they were putting me through. And that was the smartest thing I could’ve done,” says 22 year-old Clarissa.

Even when you think it’s inevitable, something can be done about it. You just have to speak up, let your voice be heard. Clarissa adds, “I have never been this happy with my life, taking a stand for myself  was the scariest and the best thing I’ve done in my life.”

Crafty Gift Ideas

We all tend to do our gift shopping last minute, and sometimes we can’t find what we want because it is last minute. But why not, instead of stressing out at store check-out lines or whether they would like it or not, why not give them something they’ll love and keep forever.

Crochet Candleholder

DIYCandleHolder
You’ll need: old crochet doilies, a balloon, wallpaper glue, and a battery-operated light
Steps: First soak five doilies into the glue, inflate the balloon, the bigger the balloon the bigger the candleholder is. Glue the doilies on the balloon right next to each other, let them overlap a little. Hang the balloon upside down to let it dry. When it’s dry pop the balloon, and there you go, a beautiful candleholder.

Mason Jar Prism Light

DIYPrismLight
You’ll need: Mason jar, round glass decorative elements, ribbon or twine, e3600 glue, tea light, lighter, and brushes
Steps: First apply the glue to the brushes, then apply it on to the Mason jar. Next apply the round glass decorations in the Mason jar all around right next to each other from top to bottom or the jar. Wait about 15-20 minutes while the glue dries. Then apply the ribbon or twine around the top of the jar to add a little more decorative touches, then insert the tea light inside of the jar and watch how it makes your room shine beautifully.

 

Decorated Coasters

DIYCoasters
You’ll need: Mod Podge (glue), a glue gun, roll of thin cork, Spray Acrylic Sealer, Foam Brushes, Small Tiles, and Photographs or Scrapbook paper
Steps: First with the hot glue gun, glue a squared piece of cork to the back of the tile, make sure it is firmly glued to the tile. Cut out any pretty scrapbook paper or any photographs that you’d like to decorate the coasters with the size of the tile. Put mod podge on the tile where you are placing the paper, place the picture and put mod podge on the picture and the tile until it is firmly on the tile. Let it dry for 10 minutes, then add a second layer of mod podge on the tile and the picture. Then you have to add 3 layers of Acrylic sealer, after every layer, wait 2 minutes. After you see that it’s dry, your decorated coasters are done and ready!

 

Now, you can give many different kinds of presents to your family that will make their heart smile.