Advice to My 13 Year-Old Self

Photo Credit: AAUW

Photo Credit: AAUW

Latinitas celebrated Women’s History Month by hosting a blog-a-thon. Members of the MyLatinitas.com community shared heartfelt advice they wish they were told when they were 13 years old.

Popularity is a big one. When I was thirteen I tried hard to be an extrovert, and I thought being ‘shy’ was a weakness. Whenever someone ignored me or was rude, I figured it was my fault. I thought I wasn’t interesting or cool enough. Then I realized that ignoring people and being rude was a bad trait, and that it wasn’t me who had to change anything about myself, but rather the other person. Trying to be popular through fake behavior, modifying our physique and being hard on ourselves can be stressful.

I’m not sure if hearing someone say this to me at 13 would’ve worked or made much sense as it does now. But the truth is that beautiful and genuinely kind girls eventually blossom into respectable women, especially if they remain honest with who they are. So it’s important to endure through those hard and confusing times, not letting anyone change who we really are.” – Giselle

“When I was 13 years old, I didn’t know how to put on makeup yet and my biggest concern in life was that there must be something wrong with me because all my friends had a boyfriend but I didn’t. I had to start thinking about where I’d go to high school and even college. I was really insecure at the time and constantly put myself down. I always felt like was never good enough for some reason.

I wish that someone had told me not to give into too many of your emotions. So often I make decisions on what I feel rather then what is logically correct and I wish someone told me to follow my head instead of my heart. I needed to hear that I need to put myself before anyone else and become the best person I could possibly be. And most importantly, I wish someone said to spend time with family. It’s so important because you sometimes often get so busy with growing up that you forget your parents also grow old too. I wish someone told me all of this but even if I heard it at 13 years old, I may have been too stubborn to actually follow this advice, but it still would have been nice anyway. ” – Claudia

All I can say is that I grew up ‘too soon’ in a sense that I [didn't have] a childhood, and my teenage years were controlled and spent at home playing video games (sometimes up to 12 hours a day)… You are still young, 13, you still have a lot of time to spend with the family! It is your decision to stay with the family or not, whether you are 13, 18, already in your mid-20′s with your own kids, it doesn’t matter; age is a number and [spending time with your family is a must]. [It's] not a choice.” – Irena

Changing for a Guy, Right or Wrong?

Thinking you found the perfect man is one of the best feelings in the world; suddenly your world has turned upside down, and your eyes shine every time you think about him, talk about him, or just look at him. First love or finding love at any age could make a girl, or woman, change herself, but sometimes change can go too far.

Love-Hearts-Sweets-Its-Love-Real-Love_art

Of course all girls say that they wouldn’t alter their personality for a guy, but it turns out to be completely different when these girls find love. Yet the question remains, is changing who you are to fit your boyfriend’s ideal girl worth it? Or is change something we do without even realizing it? Most of us say that you should be just the way you are to find love, and that you do not need to pretend to be someone else. If he falls for you then there is a chance he might be the “one.” If he falls for the lie, a time will come when pretending to be someone else gets exhausting, and you’ll both be living a lie. But sometimes changing your personality for a guy might be a good thing.

This topic can create three different stories; in one story the girl changes her awful- bipolar personality after meeting the sweetest guy ever. In another story the nice, smart girl meets the cool, bad guy, and ends up getting hurt and changing some of her personality. Then unexpectedly, she ends up falling for her boy best friend who has always been there for her. The last story, and the one that most of the girls fall for, is the one where the bad boy falls for the nice girl, and he changes who he is for her.  This story is often common, but does it always happen? Chicas, this is a big NO.

Should we change our personality for another person?

According to a blogger named Ali Hale, changing who you are is not always the best thing. If you feel like changing, it should be into something positive, but her main point is that you are who you are no matter what. She also explains that people should change at their own will. Lip Gloss Culture, a lifestyle blog, explains that women tend to change in a relationship for the simple fact that change is part of our nature. Yet, there comes a time when a girl or woman already put too much effort in the relationship, while the boyfriend doesn’t dare to do the same. Meaning, that you’ve cooked him dinner, ditched your girlfriends several times to be with him, and stopped talking to your male friends to make him happy. If he cannot do a simple thing for you then you should step back from the relationship. Lip Gloss Culture also explains that it is fine to change in a relationship, it’s part of learning through experience and committing; but girls need to see who is giving up more of themselves. You can have a relationship and still be yourself, remember that a guy is supposed to like you for who you are.

Young ladies that are already in college look back at their previous relationships and experiences and say that in fact you do change, without even noticing! These young ladies also state that even though they did change for their boyfriends, a part of them never died. Somehow girls, or women, tend to be more committed and attentive, but at the same time they are still the girl who loves to have a girls night out. Why not take a little break from the boyfriend, and see your best friend? Because you probably need it.

Some girls admit that they had given too much for a certain boyfriend because they were in love, and love itself blinded them. Looking back at those memories most girls state their boyfriends took advantage of it, but they did it to make them happy. When they finally realized what they had become, they took a stand and said enough is enough. One girl took a stand when she found out that her boyfriend cheated on her. Eventually they fixed their problems and came back together once again.

You could be the type of girlfriend who doesn’t care if your boyfriend goes out with the guys, as long as you are able to go out with your friends. It is recommended to never to forget about your friends when you have found the “one,” you will need them for a break or for support.You do not need to change completely for a guy. Remember, you can still be into classic movies, and date a guy who is all about technology and sports.

Sleek Straight to Brittle Hair

The sleek straight hair is still as popular as ever. Society’s standards have managed to focus on curly hair as being less tidy or perhaps the less than ideal counterpart. Straight hair dominates as the “perfect” predecessor to girl’s night out and weekend dates.

One must wonder, how does society play a role in the style of our hair?

Jane Diaz, 20, recalls her youth, “I used to spend hours in front of the mirror trying to mirror my friends stick straight hair. I spent so much time trying my hardest to achieve total perfection.”

After a total of 7 hours, her hair was often as curly as it was before the use of the iron. Constantly straightening hair, if not nourished, often leads to brittle or dry hair– the price that is paid for beauty.

Mia Tapia, 17, recalls the anxiety from being obsessed with having straight hair. She says, “I would come to realize that the look was a tiresome process of having to continue to use and reuse dry conditioner, gloss, and volume spray to achieve my naturally healthy curly hair back.”

Dangers of Hair Abuse

Treatments like hair straighteners are the cause for hair follicles becoming limp and frail after 40 minutes of heat induction. Most hair treatments go beyond and hour, which damages the hair in the long run. Depending on how much one is willing to pay, beauticians leave women with dry straw-like hair. Ever wonder why they insist on getting a customer to buy moisturizers? It is a situation where one gets a desired look at the price of a large bill.

Many people place hair as the epitome of beauty. If your gorgeous hair is not flowing then society is quick to label you unfit. As most people age, hair becomes thinner and soon loses its resilient ability to stay alive under the pressure of curling irons. Society may be looking past the ramifications of health for an “ideal” beauty type.

Tapia says, “If I had as much time now as I did [at 12] then, to straighten out my hair, then I would have less time to study. I would rather be smart than worry about looks.”

Perhaps society places straight hair as the only standard of beauty. One musical artist that breaks away from the straight hair phenomenon is Regina Spektor. Her hair is a massive pile of sheer bounce, but she is entirely known for her music alone. Or the wavy haired Spanish rock star, Julieta Venegas. Despite recent fashion innovations her hair does not define her music ability. So although many attend her concerts in hopes of hearing her, pure vanity is never an issue.

Too many people place hair as the standard for beauty. It is time people openly sport their natural hair and show off their fabulous locks.

Our SHEroes

Although they don’t always get as much attention as males, many inspiring notable women have made an impact throughout history. Our history books are often packed with many male heroes, but we still have a huge lack of ‘Sheroes’ stories in our history books. We asked Latinitas to write about a woman in history that they admire.

OUR SHEROES

This is what our girls had to say:

 

I admire Rosa Parks because she was brave and sat in the front of the bus when it wasn’t permitted for black women.
- Joanna

 

Rosa Parks inspires me because she stood up for women’s rights. She sat in a seat and stayed in her seat even if a white man asked her to move out of her seat. Even if all white people including the bus driver told her to move, she didn’t care and she stayed sitting on her seat. She was sent to jail but still she was a good example to the black women everywhere. This is why Rosa Parks inspires me.
-Ashlyn Rene

 

Selena Quintanilla was a big role model for women in history because of her advances in music. She won many awards and was one of the few women in her style of music.  There are many other important women in our history, but she is my main one because she loved music just as much as I do.
- Alexis

 

Susan. B. Anthony is remembered for fighting for women’s rights. She helped women gain women’s right to vote.
- Mariana

 

Frida Kahlo is a Mexican painter who is historical because of her political views and her arts. She helped spread Mexican Traditions and Woman’s rights with messages through her arts. I admire her because she says the truth, all women are beautiful the way they are, natural.

 

 

Michelle Obama is the first lady of America. She helps kids and a she makes school right. She is married to the President and is the first African-American first lady in our country. She helps kids all around the world. She is a good person.
-Halia Capers

 

Dolores Huerta era una ayudante por los trabajadores. Ella trato cosas para que las personas no se enfermaran. Ella alludo a mucha gente y la se lo seguimos agradeciendo. Alludo a mucha gente para que no se enfermaran.

 

Girl Talk: I Was Bullied

When I was in the third grade, I always did my class work and finished it quickly. I had just started my first year in my school’s gifted and talented program, which put a target, invisible to me, on my back. I wasn’t aware that people didn’t like me when I was in third grade. How could I have been? I had a group of close-knit friends and all the teachers liked me. As far as I knew, everyone liked me. As it turns out, that wasn’t the case.

One day during recess, I was cornered by three of my classmates, two girls and one boy, who were known for causing trouble and each Hispanic. Somehow we got out of the teacher’s eyesight. Suddenly, the girls were on either side of me, one holding my right arm and one holding my left. The next thing I knew, the boy punched me in the stomach. As quickly as I was cornered was how quickly it ended.

Although it lasted for only a moment, harming someone in any way because you don’t like something about him or her is bullying. Recently there has been a rise in Hispanic students bullying other Hispanic students. With Hispanic girls having the highest rate of attempted suicide, one has to think this rate might be directly connected to the rise in bullying.

So what’s the definition of bullying? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, bullying someone means to treat someone abusively or to affect by means of force or coercion. According to Stopbullying,gov, bullying is “unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance.” There are several different types of bullying such as physical, verbal, spreading rumors, excluding someone, intimidation and cyberbullying.

Why are kids being bullied? Appearance and social status are two of the main reasons people are bullied. Bullies pick on the people they think are different for some reason or do not fit in. Being able to identify who the bullies are is also a critical step in stopping bullying. Most bullies share some common characteristics. They like to dominate others and generally only care about themselves. They often have poor social skills and poor social judgment. Sometimes they are actually jealous of the person they are bullying or want to act out because they were once hurt by a bully them selves. Bullies put down others in order to feel more interesting and powerful. Today, bullying is on the rise within the Hispanic community. Sometimes young Hispanics who are second or third generation Americans are bullying others who are first generation Americans and those who aren’t citizens.

What can you do if you are being bullied or if you see someone else being bullied? I think girls need to know what bullying is so they can easily recognize bullies. They should also know what to do when they’re bullied or witness another being bullied.First, tell either your parents or a trusted adult at school. Don’t be afraid that telling on the bully will get you in trouble. Adults can often devise a way to get you or others out of the bullying situation. This can be done without the bully ever knowing how they found out about it in the first place. Also, if you or your friends are worried about the bullying escalating to violence, avoid being alone.

Tips for you/others about surviving bullying:
1. Ignore the bully and walk away: Don’t be bothered by them and eventually they’ll give up. Getting angry or physical is exactly what the bully wants.
2. Take charge of your life: Join an extracurricular activity, club, or class. These places are the best places to make friends and gain the confidence you can use to avoid bullies.
3. Talk about it: Talking to someone about what you are going through is sometimes the best therapy. Confide in someone and you’ll feel better.4
4. The best thing to do to stop bullying is to tell someone when you get bullied and don’t be afraid to speak out on someone’s behalf if they are being bullied. Speaking against a bully sometimes isn’t the easiest thing to do, but realize that many of your classmates probably feel uncomfortable when they witness someone getting bullied.

A quote from Abraham Joshua Heschel can be applied to bullying. He said, “Few are guilty, but all are responsible.” Though you may not be guilty of being a bully, it is your responsibility to do the right thing by helping those being bullied in whatever way you can. If you stand by and do nothing, you are responsible in part for that person’s pain.

Girl Talk: What is Beautiful?

Young Latinas are taking a stand against digital photo altering in magazines for teens and women to redefine what is beautiful. Many fashion magazines feature pictures that are “perfected” with the help of technology tools like Photoshop.  Digital altering can completely change the image of model from hair color to waistline and blemishes to weight. How does that affect girls? Many young girls are going on diets and even getting eating disorders in an attempt to keep up with these false standards of beauty. These Latinitas sound off sharing their frustration in seeing unrealistic images of girls in media and their thoughts on real beauty.

  • “Dear Teen Magazine Editor, Please stop using Photoshop because it is damaging women’s self-esteem.” -Jenna Aguilar, age 12
  • “Dear Teen Vogue, Don’t  put Photoshop pictures because girls are hurting themselves.Every one is different and people can’t relate to this. If you may, please no more Photoshopped pictures.” – Katrina Estrada, age 13
  • “Dear 17 Magazine Editor, Do you know what it’s like to be charged with murder? Many girls, teens, and women take there life every single day. Why? Because they can’t “fit in.” Sure Photoshoping may not seem like a big deal but in reality, it’s bigger that it can ever seem.  It would be better if you stop but even if you don’t, maybe cutting down on Photoshop might help. Take it into consideration please!”- Sincerely, Maria.
  • “Stop changing people’s look because it is causing kids to feel bad and get surgery. Please stop Photoshopping.”- Yoselin Martinez, age 13
  • “Dear Teen Vogue, Can you please stop Photoshopping? It is making girls insecure because they want to be or look exactly like the models and have gone through Anorexia or Bulemia just to look like them. Can please stop? Thanks.” -Frida, age 13
  • “Dear 17 magazine, Why would you change someone else’s body? They are perfect the way they are! If you don’t think so then you should be fired! Stop Photoshop!”-  Faith, age 11
  • “Dear 17 magazine, Please stop changing the girls because I want to see who they really are. No more photoshop!”- Ashley, age 10
  • “Please stop using Photoshop pictures, it makes girls want to look like models.” – Kimberly
  • “I think you shouldn’t edit because it’s fake and when you see a famous person it looks totally different and they disappoint people.” -Cynthia
  • “Dear  Teen Vogue Editor, Please stop using Photoshopped images in your magazines it is very harmful to girls and their bodies.” Sincerely, Natalina Acosta.
  • “Dear Editor, I think that you should stop Photoshop. I think people will love them (models) even if you don’t edit it. They look fake when people see them in real life! Everybody can tell and people will notice. Just saying!” -Sincerely, Delilah.
  • “Dear Editor, I think Photoshop is a bad example to little kids and they get the wrong idea of how girls should be.They want to be like the celebrities on TV and magazines.” -Deseree Martinez
  • “Dear Designers, I think you should cut down on  Photoshopping, that way girls and women can stop trying to be like the women on TV that are not real. I think little girls start to get that in their head and when they get older they do the same and then don’t look as pretty as they already are.”  - Desiree Tarango
  • “Dear 17 Magazine Editors, I think you should stop using Photoshop because it makes us all feel bad about our bodies.”
  • “Dear Editors, Please stop using Photoshop it discriminates women.There are 8 year olds who want to use Botox just to be like the girls on magazines who are fake. Please Stop.”-   Maria G. C.
  • “Dear Teen Vogue, Photoshop is stupid it makes girls feel insecure. It’s not about the looks its about what they feel inside.”-  Sincerely, Lauren
  • “Dear Editor, Hi my name is Jessica and I’m 12 years old.I wish you could really stop using Photoshop in most of the photos. I think it’s really hurting girls my age. Please! I would really appreciate it.”   -Jessica Ceballos
  • “Dear 17 Magazine, Please stop using Photoshopped images in your magazine. Those pictures have negative effects on girls like me.” -Deliah age 13
  • “Dear Teen Vogue, Can you please stop using Photoshop because 5th graders worry about their weight and feel really bad. It’s only hurting girls.” -Katherine Vazquez, age 11
  • “Dear 17 magazine, Please stop using Photoshopped pictures in your magazines, they make young girls feel bad about their bodies.”-  Miranda Galindo, age 11
  • “Dear 17 Magazine, Please stop using Photoshop pictures in your magazine, they make young girls feel bad about their bodies.”  Desiree Ramirez, age 12
  • “Dear 17 Magazine, Please stop the Photoshoping.”- EMM

Why Justin Bieber Is Lucky

Teen heartthrob Justin Bieber, with his boyish charm, has made girls around the world swoon in stadiums everywhere. Since his discovery in 2008, he has topped the Billboard charts with his hits such as “Baby” and “Boyfriend,” been on the cover of nearly every magazine and has even been featured on the big screen with his documentary “Never Say Never.” Many may call him lucky, but it isn’t his good looks, fame, or fortune that make him lucky. Let’s face it, it’s his lady by this side, Selena Gomez.

Let’s start off with the fact that she’s Latina and proud of it. She was born in Grand Prairie, Texas in 1992 to Italian mother, Amanda Dawn Teefy, and Mexican father, Ricardo Joel Gomez. Named after the famous Latina artist, Selena Quintanilla, Selena Gomez has shown from the get-go that she really embraces her culture as a young Latina. In her interview with Elle Magazine, she comments, “Growing up, [teen idols] were all blond, with light-colored eyes. I wanted to be that. I didn’t realize how important it was to represent my background and my culture until parents of Latin descent started coming up to me. Then it clicked. I can represent a different generation and a different culture.” Aware of the few Latinas in the entertainment business, Selena strives to represent a positive figure for the number of young Latinas in the U.S and the world. Many would say that she’s been a great role model for Latinas, surely Justin would agree.

Not only is she proud of her roots, she also works to empower Latinos and others who are less fortunate, and she encourages Justin to do so as well.  A project that highlights her desire and motivation for the cause to empower the Latino population in particular, is the program she participated in called “Programa Puente.” It is a movement in Chile that seeks to end poverty, prevent violence within the home and empower people through education.  Since she’s been with Justin, he’s gotten involved, too! The couple raised over $200,000 earlier this year at the second annual benefit concert in Los Angeles for UNICEF. You see, Justin? Just because you’re young doesn’t mean that you can’t get involved!

Justin would probably be the first to say that creative expression is important, but there are other ways to let the world know who you are and what you represent other than music. Launched in 2009, Selena Gomez expressed her personal sense of style and individuality by starting her fashion line Dream Out Loud. Not only is it a way for her to express herself in a positive way, but also a means to send out a message. An inspirational message is attached to the clothing tag, promoting positive messages to girls who buy her clothing! A girl who can motivate people through fashion, Justin’s has a creative girl on his hands, huh?

More than just a creative girlfriend, Selena is a good friend. She’s extremely supportive and encouraging. She was the first to be notified when long-time Disney friend Demi Lovato decided to check herself into rehab for an eating disorder. She was a huge support for her friend and publicly made all kinds of statements offering positive messages and encouraging words to her friend while she was in recovery. Fellow Latina Demi Lovato comments, “…the people that are really there for me are the people that were there for me when I went into treatment.” Guess who? Selena, of course. Supporting her friends in times of need is something that is clearly important to her. What’s really admirable is her ability to balance a busy schedule, a boyfriend, and maintain strong friendships. She’s quite the catch, Justin.

We all see the Biebs on the television, hear him on the radio and even in the news and we think, “Oh, he’s so great!” We never stop to think about why he’s so great, so lucky. Not only does he walk hand-in-hand with a beautiful girl, but he also has the support of a strong and independent woman. She’s a role model, generous, creative, a great friend and she’s Latina. What more could you want, Biebs?

Girl Talk: Magazine Models

Latinitas speak out about all the photoshopping done to magazine covers and advertisements.  With the ease of photo editing software, magazine editors are altering the images of models and what you see isn’t always real. Find out what these Latinitas readers think in their letters to the editors of teen magazines expressing their opinions.

Dear Editor,
It’s rude to make women too pretty and too skinny. You shouldn’t do that because God gives the models their bodies. I don’t like the pictures of your “models” because some of your pictures on the magazines look weird. I don’t like the way you lie to make the girls in the world try to be like the pictures in the magazines.
Erika

Dear Editor,
How could you do this to girls? How could you change the faces of the models in the magazines? I don’t want any girls or boys to believe they are real. You tried to make them beautiful but you made them look bad. Stop changing the way they look. Don’t you feel guilty for what you have done?
Sinthia

Dear Editor,
Stop changing women’s faces just because they look different than you how you want them to look in the magazines. You don’t have to change their look! They should not be changed because of how they look. If they say they want to change their look then it is okay. It is better to get people to see the real you! Think about it please. Do you really think you are doing the right thing?
April

Dear Editor,
I feel bad about what you do to the people that like to have their picture taken. They think that they are cute in the pictures but it is not true. When Latinitas told us about what the magazines are doing it made me feel bad.
Karyme

Dear Editor,
I think it isn’t nice to change people’s faces on the computer. I think they are pretty just the way they are.
Michelle

Dear Editor,
I don’t think you are making your models look better because you are actually making them look bad. It is not ok.
Stephanie

Dear Editor,
You should be ashamed of yourself. You are changing girl’s faces and making younger girls believe that’s how we should look.
Jacqueline

Dear Editor,
We, the girls of Latinitas, have seen your magazine and are very mad because we saw the video online of the woman you picked to be in the magazine. The pictures were amazing but that’s not how she looks in real life. You did her hair and makeup but then you made changes to the picture on your computer. We have no chance to look beautiful anymore because now that we know you made changes to the pictures, people will now try to change their faces so they can look like the girls in the magazine. But you should know that beauty is in the inside not on the outside.
Anonymous

Dear Editor,
I’m very mad because of what you do with your magazine. After you take pictures you think you make them look better but all you are doing is making girls and women feel like they’re not pretty enough. That’s not fair to them or to us! Please stop and leave the models how they are.
Anonymous

Dear Editor,
I think you shouldn’t change models. It’s like you’re telling her she is not good enough. There is no point of having a model if they can’t stay the same way they are. You make me feel like nobody is pretty enough. I don’t like that you lie to us about how they look. I want to see their true beauty, not someone they aren’t.
Alyssa

Dear Editor,
We saw an ad of a girl that wasn’t the real picture of her. I didn’t like it because it wasn’t really her. It wasn’t her real body. If we were you, we wouldn’t have changed her.
Anonymous

Feel free to participate and send your comments below.

Express Yourself

Growing up there are tons of pressures from school to issues with friends and family.  These chicas have found creative outlets to express themselves, let out their feelings, deal with emotions and destress.

“I write in my journal or take a run. I don’t like talking about my emotions.”
-Kylah, age 12

“I express my emotions by drawing, writing and listening to music. When I’m sad I usually draw my emotions. If I’m angry, I listen to music that reflects my emotions. I write in my diary everyday talking about what is on my mind and I’m feeling.”
-Katrina, age 13

“We can express our feelings in a healthy way. To feel happy, you can like help each other on stuff. When you are sad, you can do a journal and write about it. When you are angry, make something that would make you feel good or happy. When I am nervous, I make an effort and do the best I can.”
-Jacqueline, age 11

When I’m sad, I start crying. When I’m nervous I just think about positive things. When I’m angry, I go to my room and yell in the pillow. I think of JB (Justin Bieber) and he makes me happy.
-Katlyn, age 12

My Goals

These chicas are dreaming big. Girls describe their personal, career and community goals.

My career and education goal is to go to college at UT Austin and get A’s in all my classes. My community goal is to go green. My goal for my family is to grow bigger. My friends goal is to finish school and get a job. –Jennifer

For my personal goal, I want to make better choices. My education and career goal is to get straight A’s and I want to be in the CSI. For my community, I want to use less water, pick up trash and recycle. I want to not argue as much and just stay happy for my family goal. A goal for my friend is hopefully bond with her dad and be closer. -Danielle

For my personal goal, I want to be the best teacher when I grow up. My educational and career goal is I want to continue school so when I grow up I’ll be a teacher. I want to help the planet with recycling in the neighborhood for my community goal. When I grow up and have my child and my husband I want to move to New Mexico. A goal for my friend is to help him move and help him put his stuff in his desk. -Darlene

A personal goal for me to become a mom. My career goal is to become a fashion designer. I want to clean up the streets for a better community. I want to encourage everyone to dance and be happy. A goal for my friend is to help her meet Taylor Swift!! :) -Anaiz

I want to be a singer. One of my career goals is to go to school to be a teacher. To make this a better planet I will go downtown and recycle. I want to encourage my family to follow their dreams. I want to help my friends achieve their goals. -Mia

My goal is to be successful. I would like to go to college to be a doctor. I would like to help the earth by cleaning around the neighborhood. I would like for my family to be happy and successful. A goal for my friends is to be very nice and always follow their dreams. -Selena

My personal goal is to be a singer. I want to school and succeed as my career goal. I would like for everybody to clean the community. I would like for my family to all to go to school. I would like for my friends to succeed with what they want to do. -Jenny

I always wanna make sure that im on my best behavior. My goal is to get better grades. My goal for the community is to stop polluting. A goal for my family is to save more money and be successful. A goal for my friend is stay together and never give up on her dreams. -Victoria

 

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