Young Female Artists in San Antonio

ArtSuppliesSan Antonio features several young artists, musicians, and poets throughout the city. Meet some of the vibrant artistic women in San Antonio.

Manuela Gonzales

Born in Venezuela, she began to discover her love for drawing at an early age. Now, she attends St. Mary’s University as an Internal Relations student and still regularly draws on the side. Most of her artwork focuses on her own thoughts and desires.

“Everything else in the world is so analytical and art is the one thing that has no rules. Anything you think of can be created into a reality,” said Manuela.  She intends to incorporate art into her future profession as well. Some of her artwork can be viewed at plumeetencre on Tumblr.

Sarah Garcia

Sara Garcia, 19, will be attending the Art Institute of Chicago this fall. As a child, her mom would always make creative projects since she had access to a lot of supplies as a pre-k teacher but her interest in the fine arts really began to peak during high school. A lot of her art focuses on the vast traditions and folklore in her Chicana heritage. Her personal cultural experiences provides a connection between her art and the viewer. Sarah plans on getting her Bachelors of Fine Arts to make a career out of her art. Her artwork can be seen at saritagarciaart on Instagram.

Natalie Dee Sauceda

Natalie Dee Sauceda, 18, also found her passion for art at a young start. She began drawing in kindergarden in order to fully express herself and she hasn’t stopped since then. Natalie believes art is important to her because “it breaks down social barriers and creates a sense of identity for the artist” and she plans to use art in her future profession. Her artwork may not be suitable for younger viewers or those who are easily offended, but you can find her grotesque artwork at gatalajara on Instagram.

If you would like your art featured by Latinitas, e-mail your art work to editor@latinitasmagazine.org. 

Rocking Out with Latina Musicians

Music2Being Latina is something to be proud of. What better way to express your inner self than through music! Take a look at some albums by Latinas who are not afraid to express their culture and themselves.

Shakira – Shakira

Being a Latina, Shakira is an amazing and inspiring artist to listen to! Her new and tenth album, Shakira, has a variety of rhythms that are sure to satisfy a variety of music tastes. Shakira and multilingual abilities draws a variety of listeners and other feature singers into her new album so check it out for some upbeat tunes!

Christina Aguilera- Lotus 

Although this album was released in November of 2012, the meaning and message behind each song remains the same. The songs reach out to its listeners as empowering songs and they promote an inner strength that Aguilera was feeling at the time she wrote and sang these songs.

Mariah Carey- Me. I Am Mariah 

From the sounds of the singles released from this album so far seem to be confident songs and of being independent. Even from the title of the album, “Me. I Am Mariah”, lets the listener know that her songs as a Latina are going to be ones pertaining to being your own person.

Paulina Rubio- Pau Factor 

Paulina Rubio is an empowering Latina singer that many younger girls look up to. This is because, as can be seen in this album, her songs are upbeat and meaningful. The lyrics can easily fit your mood and and the beat is so catchy and entertaining. It is definitely worth taking some time to listen to her latest album!

Jennifer Lopez- A.K.A. 

JLo’s latest album features collaborations with Iggy Azalea and Sia. Her variety in this album will be sure to reach the music tastes of music lovers everywhere. Her songs are also known for their upbeat tunes which is another reason to anxiously await her new album!

All these great Latina singers should make you want to listen to their albums when you feel like listening to upbeat and enthusiastic music. Get your headphones and speakers ready to rock these great tunes!

Five Latinas Taking Action

The earth’s climate is changing and human activity is to blame. What may seem like a distant problem left for countries across the world to deal with actually affects us at home. Environmental health hazards are especially impacting Latino communities and workplaces nationwide. Recycling and reusing are some ways we can help make a difference in the environment, but there are even bigger issues that we need to solve. Here are five Latinas working hard to make the earth and Latino communities healthier and safer!

SUSANA ALMANZA, P.O.D.E.R.
Austin, Texas

Photo Credit: statesman.com

 

East Austin native Susanna Almanza works to bridge the gap between environmental issues and social and economic justice. As director and founding member of Austin’s P.O.D.E.R.(People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources), Almanza and the organization seek to increase awareness and active advocacy in communities affected by toxic pollution and unfair economic development. Her impact extends from local and national efforts, such as membership of the City of Austin Environmental Board and service on numerous committees including the EPA’s Title VI Implementation Advisory Committee.

VICTORIA A. ARROYO, Georgetown Law School
Washington, D.C.

 

Photo credit: ted.com

 

Graduating magna cum laude with her B.S. from Emory and J.D. from Georgtown Law School, and with top honors with her M.P.A. from Harvard, Arroyo’s dynamic career and accomplishments include extensive work in environmental policy, general counsel, carbon emission programs and economics to name a few. Arroyo is the Assistant Dean for Centers and Institutes and director of the Climate Center of Georgetown University Law Center. She oversees projects on climate mitigation and teaches environmental law courses at Georgetown Law School, as well as serves on the editorial boards of the Climate Policy journal and the Georgetown International Environmental Law Review. Arroyo has worked in private firms and served in two offices at U.S. EPA, with responsibilities including the review of development of standards under the Clean Air Act.

ANDREA DELGADO, Earth Justice

Washington D.C.

Photo credit: earthjustice.org

 

Andrea Delgado’s passion for the environment comes from growing up in the Ecuadorian Amazonia. She is part of Earth Justice’s Policy and Legislation team where she develops and implements strategies to protect public health from hazardous waste, chemicals and pesticides in the workplace. She works with Congress and federal agencies to strengthen policy and also serves on the Advisory Board of Voces Verde. In 2008, Delgado became the first Fellow of the National Latino Coalition on Climate Change and in 2011, won the national MillerCoors Líder of the Year Award for her work on labor and environmental issues.

 

BEATRIZ PEREZ, Coca-Cola

Atlanta, Georgia

Photo credit: voices.mckinseysociety.com

 

In July 2011, Beatriz Perez became The Coca-Cola Company’s first-ever Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO). For nearly twenty years, Perez has worked with the company’s marketing programs, which range for various media and entertainment, American Idol, entertainment, university marketing, sports properties and more. She is behind Coca-Cola’s efforts to incorporate sustainability into its business practice, which includes changes to its packaging, recycling, delivery and fuel cost alternatives. Perez also works to promote women entrepreneurship and recently helped start a Ghana water center to reduce time locals spent getting drinking water.

ADRIANNA QUINTERO, Voces Verde

San Francisco, California

Photo credit: vocesverdes.org

 

Adrianna Quintero is the founder and executive director of Voces Verdes, an independent non-partisan coalition of Latino advocates for sound environmental policy changes and support for clean, renewable energy. Quintero specializes in public health issues revolving around safe drinking water, bottled water, pesticides and toxic air pollution. She is also the senior attorney at NRDC. Quintero has litigated before the Supreme Court, testified before Congressional subcommittees and the United Nations, and appeared on national and international English and Spanish television and radio programs. Her 2004 report, “Hidden Danger: Environmental Health Threats in the Latino Community” marked the beginning of her mission to engage and inform Latinos about environmental health threats.

 

Latina Spotlight: Leading Latinas

Photo Credit: AAUW

Photo Credit: AAUW

Latinitas celebrated Women’s History Month by hosting a blog-a-thon. Members of the MyLatinitas.com community shared who they admired and why:

I will be honest. I am not a big sports fan. But if there is one revolutionary Latina that just has to be mentioned in sports, that has to be Rebecca Lobo. If you are a basketball fan, you might now that Rebecca was part of the 1996 Olympic women’s “Dream Team,” but let me tell you a little more about her.

Born in Hartford, CT, Rebecca was around basketball at a young age. Her career highlights include awards such as the NCAA Women’s Basketball Player of the Year (1995) and the ESPY Award for Outstanding Female Athlete in 1995. She won these awards and many more at a time where women in sports was something taboo, and extremely unheard of.

While she is currently playing for the Houston Comets, her career as a professional basketball player began after her graduation from the University of Connecticut with a bachelor’s degree in Political Science in 1995.

Rebecca’s star status grew when she started playing college basketball and was one of the women who showed America and the world that WOMEN PLAY SPORTS!” – Ingrid

Selena Quintanilla is my inspiration because she was an amazing Latina singer. She set a good reputation for herself also, she inspired so many young Latina girl.” – Alizae

Today I met Josefina Vazquez Mota, one of Mexico’s first female presidential candidates. She ran for the 2012 presidential elections. I remember I was in Thailand at the time and wasn’t able to vote for her but was hugely concerned over whether she would win. In the end, she wasn’t elected, but was still hugely recognized. Today, in New York City, she presented her book on the success stories of Mexicans in the US, titled “El sueño que unió la frontera.

Josefina is a Latina like you and I. She was born in Mexico but believes in the power of Latinos, not only in the US, but in Latin America as well. Here or there we’re all bound to fight for a cause, she expressed.

 I grew up believing I needed to belong somewhere. One place, only one. I was born in Brownsville, Texas (as I have probably mentioned a million times) and would drive to Mexico every other weekend. With time, I realized that I loved both places, but I also knew they weren’t very similar, and this caused a feeling of contradiction within me” – Giselle

 

Leading Latina: Christina Garcia

Photo Credit: http://las-americas.org/

Photo Credit: http://las-americas.org/

Written by Rebecca Jackson

Immigration reform is a pressing political issue in the United States as people from around the world cross borders to find better opportunities for themselves and their families.  A Latina making an impact to help immigrants is Christina Garica. Christina Garcia is the Program Coordinator for the Battered Immigrant Women department at Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center in El Paso, Texas. That’s a long title for a crucial job.

Garcia’s Contribution to Her Community

In her own words, Garcia “takes care of people who are victims of crimes and domestic abuse.” She does this by connecting clients to the visas they need to stay safe.

The first is a Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) Visa which protects women who are married to United States citizens and suffer from domestic violence. The Violence Against Women Act, which was first passed in 1994, created a number of laws that politicians hoped would help prevent violence against women and provide better support for women who had experienced violence. Legislators at the time realized that many non-citizen and undocumented people, mostly women, experiencing domestic violence were not reporting the abuse to the police for fear of losing their immigration status and being deported. The VAWA Visa encourages immigrant women to report domestic abuse by giving them access to legal residence that doesn’t depend on their relationship to an abusive partner.

The second type of visa is a U-Visa. A U-Visa allows undocumented people who are the victims of crimes and have cooperated with the authorities to attain legal permanent residence. The U-Visa encourages people to report crimes without fear of deportation. “These issue are right at the center of human rights,” says Garcia.

When asked what she wanted young Latinas to know about domestic violence and the immigrant community she had a lot of wisdom to share.

“I think people tend to view immigration as an isolated issue that only a few people experience, when in reality immigration is this universal issue that happens all over the world. If you sit 10 people down in a room at least half of those people know an immigrant,” she said.

For Garcia, acknowledging that immigrants make up an important portion of our communities means that “when we confront violence against women we can’t focus only on women who are citizens or who have papers.”

She wants Latinas to be aware that, “it doesn’t matter what immigration status you have, if you are the victim of a crime or the victim of domestic violence, or if someone is pushing you to do something that you don’t want to, than it’s important to know that this isn’t right and that there is something that you can do about it. If it isn’t happening to you, it might be happening to someone you know, or it might happen to someone you’ll meet in the future.”

She took a breath before leaning forward and emphasizing that, “it is important to know that there are people who can help and you don’t need to have hundreds of thousands of dollars to get the assistance that you need.”

Garcia’s last comment points to the importance of organizations like Las Americas. Immigration law is complicated. Cases take a long time and require lots of complex paperwork to be filled out correctly, efficiently, and then sent to the right government office. Very few people could get all of that done without legal assistance from an attorney or someone professionally trained in immigration law. Unfortunately, hiring a lawyer can be extremely expensive (not to mention the money the government charges you just to turn in you paperwork!) and many of the people who qualify for VAWA or U-visas are low income. So Garcia and the other wonderful ladies of Las Americas work to provide immigrants with quality legal care at low cost. For Garcia it all comes down to giving back.

“As a Latina and a low-income person who had the opportunity to be educated, I think it’s kind of an obligation to give back to your community at some point in your career. I think I’ve been blessed to be able to do that here. It would be so cool if everybody thought like that,” she said.

Career Spotlight: Reporter

Name: Denise Olivasdenise-olivas-image-jpg

Position & Title: Reporter/Anchor

Employer: KVIA

Location: El Paso, TX

What are some of your job responsibilities?
I am a reporter for Good Morning El Paso and co-anchor for ABC-7 at Noon. Some of my responsibilities include gathering stories, conducting interviews, and writing and editing stories for newscasts.

Describe your educational background and how it helped you prepare for your career.
I graduated from Riverside High School in 2004. Immediately following I continued my education at the University of Texas at El Paso. I graduated in 2009 with a degree in Communication – Electronic Media. The classes I took in college taught me how important writing is in a journalism career. It is a very different style of writing that takes a lot of practice.

How did you find your current job?
I started at KVIA in 2009 as an intern. Several weeks after my internship ended, I was called back and offered a job opening as a producer/writer.

What did you do to prepare for a career in the media?
I made sure to finish my college education. My internship at KVIA also gave me a front row experience of television news and all the work it takes to put a newscast together.

What is your favorite part of your job?
I really enjoy meeting the people of El Paso and the stories they have to share. I like telling their stories and appreciate that they allow me to do so. I also enjoy covering breaking news.

What is the most challenging part of your job?
Breaking news and deadlines are the most challenging. It always keeps me on my toes. As a reporter, I always have to be ready in the event something major happens.

What advice would you give to help a girl prepare for a job like yours?
Education is key!

What do you do for fun when you are not working?
I really enjoy working out when I’m not at work. It really helps relieve stress and keeps me strong and healthy.

Latinas Find Voice, Identity in Art

girls3The future art majors of the world are about to hit the homestretch of their high school careers. Already, art hopefuls are awaiting art school response letters and anticipating the hardships of futures as professional artists. Despite all the stress and uncertainty, young creatives remain as passionate as ever.

Gabby Desporte, a high school senior at McCallum Fine Arts Academy (MFAA), says that she can remember always loving to draw, but it wasn’t until middle school that drawing became something more than just an activity she liked to do. “When I heard about McCallum, that’s when I was like, alright, I want to make some kind of career out of this,” Desporte said. MFAA is located in Austin, Texas and appeals to students wanting to hone and challenge their skills in the fine arts. There is an application process which includes portfolios, auditions, and teacher recommendations. If chosen, students must be prepared to dedicate four years to the program. “I didn’t know what I wanted to be when I grew up,” Desporte said, “but I knew that I wanted to do some kind of art, so I immersed myself.”

Since then, Desporte has been attempting to figure out which careers will allow her to infuse art with a more financially secure profession. College has always been in the equation, she says, and though her parents have always been supportive, they’ve also wanted her to keep her goals feasible. Currently, she’s considering pursuing a degree in advertising.

Maya Medrano, also a senior at MFAA, finds herself in a similar position. Like Desporte, she has been drawing since she was very young. Art has since weaved itself into her every-day life. “I’ll be doing something and then all of a sudden, oh look, there’s a sketch,” Medrano said. “Recently the first thing I do in the morning and the last thing I do before I go to bed is sketch in my sketchbook. Sometimes I just wish the world could pause so I could get all these ideas out,” Medrano said.

Combining her love of drawing and storytelling, Medrano’s ideal situation is to build a career in comics. However, she’s already prepping herself for the obstacles she may meet in the professional art world. “I’ve met with a lot of comic book artists,” she said. “An alumni from one of the colleges I’m applying to was saying, ‘If I had to go back, I would definitely take a major in something broader.’” The advice has pushed Medrano to change her focus from sequential art to illustration which she hopes will broaden her freelancing opportunities.

Beyond the concerns of careers, art has remained a helpful and essential element in both young artists’ lives, allowing them to examine their surroundings and even themselves through the lens of art. This includes how their Hispanic heritage influences or, in some cases, does not influence, their work.

Desporte is currently working on a project detailing street life in Latino communities, specifically the cholo community. Because her subject is a traditionally marginalized and stigmatized group of people, she says that the images sometimes come across as intense to outsiders. She hopes that her project will showcase something deeper. “They are human too,” she emphasizes. “There’s still going to be those sweet candid moments. They actually are approachable people.”

Medrano, on the other hand, has found herself being less influenced by Latino culture and admits to feeling like she is awkwardly stuck between her Mexican heritage and her American upbringing. Instead, her largest influences came from Japanese manga and anime, superhero cartoons, and horror films. And yet, her experiences through art have been more introspectively enlightening. “Without art, I definitely think I would be more lost and would not have figured out as much about myself,” she said. “I actually think that art is just my default way of life. Art is the same thing as having brown skin.”

Desporte agrees. Art is a way of life.

While both artists admit to feeling worried about the future and about the career path they will soon be pursuing, they also carry with them the understanding that art is just part of their genetic code. “You wake up in the morning and you understand that art is what you do,” Desporte says. “You encapsulate yourself in it. It just becomes a part of you.”

Latinas and the Pulitzer Prize

pulitzer_logoThe Pulitzer Prize is the  most esteemed award in journalism, literature and art. The ultimate medal at the end of a successful race every journalist aspires to receive. This prize not only represents an incredible journey, but also the talent and dedication put into their career. Administered by Columbia University, the Pulitzer board is made up of 19 of the best leading journalists and executives from across the country. For a very long time now, Latinos have been making their names known through-out America bringing about a change in the world of communications. Although they make up a part of the minority in the country, a small group can make a difference in society.

Miami Herald Executive Editor Aminda Marques and playwright Quiara Alegria Hudes are the two leading Latinas that have been selected to join the board in recent years.

Aminda Marques

Marques, 49,  graduated from Hialeah High and the University of Florida. She began her journalism career 25 years ago at The Miami Herald where she interned covering community news.  Now, she oversees The Herald’s newsroom for print and online content. She left the Miami Herald for some time to lead People’s Magazine Miami bureau, but returned to The Herald in 2007 as a multimedia and features editor where she helped launch Miami.com, and redesigned the tropical life section. In addition, she later was named Executive Editor in November 2010; making her the second woman and the first Hispanic to hold the position. Once she was back in the office, Marques was assigned the lead coverage of the Haiti earthquake and was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2011.

Quiara Alegria Hudes

Born to a Jewish father and a Puerto Rican mother, Quiara was raised in West Philadelphia where she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Music Composition at Yale, and playwriting at Brown University. Some of her most notable productions are Elliot, A Soldier’s Fugue, Water by the Spoonful, and The Happiest Song Plays Last. In 2007, Elliot was a Pulitzer Prize finalist, and has been performed around the country, Romania, and Brazil. After its premiere at the Hartford Stage Company, her play Water by the Spoonful, sequel to Elliot, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2012. Her latest production The Happiest Song Plays Last opened in the Goodman Theatre in Chicago earlier in this year, which completed the last piece of the trilogy. She is also the second woman and first Hispanic to be introduced into the Central High School’s Alumni Hall Of Fame – her former high school.

Latinas have a powerful force in the department of journalism and the arts. The number of Latinos getting involved in the media is notably increasing and it is proof that anybody that has a vision for the future can succeed.

Artist Spotlight: Latina Artists

For Hispanic Heritage month, Latinitas asked interns to spotlight a Latina artist everyone should know. Alexandra and Rebecca shared their favorite Latina artist, their favorite artwork, and why you should know more about them.

onelittleindianvsthecorporatetrollslauramolinaLaura Molina is a Latina Artist born and raised in East Los Angeles. Her style of artwork is known to be influenced by the Chicano Movement of the 1960′s, and  Mexican culture. She is also heavily influenced by Frida Kahlo, another Latina artist. Through some of her pieces you can see the underlying political messages associated with the struggle of being a Latina in America. Molina attended college at the California Institute of the Arts pursing the subject of animated character art. Molina also published her own comic book called “Cihualyaomiquiz, The Jaguar”  which playfully told the story of an Aztec woman warrior who is dedicated to the empowerment of women as well as the struggle for social justice and basic human rights. In 2006 she founded a Chicano Art Magazine to help promote new up and coming Chicano artist.  I personally enjoy her art work because you are able to look at the art as a whole but if you take a closer look you can truly come to see the reason behind the art. Just looking at her art makes you think, and feel what she must have felt during that time. One of my favorite pieces is called ”One Little Indian vs The Corporate Trolls.” I feel like this painting is sending a powerful message that Latinas will continue to stand up for their rights and stand against the stereotypes we often see in the media.  - Alexandra Castillo, PR Intern

png_base64c3675afea46b589eFavianna Rodriguez’s artwork is absolutely stunning; her activism inspiring. A Latina from Oakland, California, Rodriguez’s work skillfully combines gorgeous visual art and social justice messages. Notable for a strong personal style, Rodriguez’s art is instantly recognizable as a “Favi piece”. Her use of bold and fluid lines, striking colors, and exceptional composition reflect her long experience in printmaking. A prolific artist, her work has touched on many issues including immigrant rights, women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, and food justice. I am especially a fan of her “Migration is Beautiful” series which highlights the beauty of the Monarch butterfly as a symbol for migrant rights. The project encourages people all over the country to make large wearable butterfly wings and post their pictures online in support of migrant rights. Wearing the beautifully detailed wings transforms the wearers into walking, talking, living, breathing public art pieces and political messages. The wings highlight their presence as people and make a powerful statement: “I am here. Look at me! I am priceless. I am an immigrant and I am beautiful.” The message is clear. Migration is beautiful.

When Rodriguez isn’t making art, she works as a powerful activist directing CultureStrike a national organization which connects artists of all kinds to migrant issues. She is also the co-founder of Presente.organ online nation network dedicated to empowering Latino communities.

Learn more about Favianna Rodriguez at her website here. You can check out more of her art in her online archives and follow her on Facebook.   – Rebecca Jackson, Youth Editorial Advisory Board Member

 

Becoming a Media Superstar

María Elena Salinas, an inspiring role model for Latinas, has had an amazing career at the Spanish-language news station. María is a journalist from Los Angeles who has grown and developed throughout her career at Univision.

Being born and raised in California to two Mexican immigrants gives her the on-the-ground knowledge of several aspects of the Latina experience. Her hard work that has turned into successful reporting and shines light on the strength and resilience that every Latina embodies.

According to her page on Univision News’s Tumblr, Salinas “has interviewed every U.S. President since Jimmy Carter and has been face to face with dozens of Latin American heads of state, rebel leaders, and dictators.”

For entertainment, for relaxation, or for information, television channels are ready to connect with their audience. Latinos, in particular, are eager to immerse themselves into the discussion about current events.

Univision covers the news that Latinos in the United States want to know more about, and their ratings are constantly improving and breaking records.

As TV By the Numbers reports, “the Spanish-language network was the No. 1 broadcast network among Adults 18-49 on 38 nights in 2012.” Not only is Univision an option for those who would like to watch the news in Spanish, it is also grabbing the attention of coveted young viewers to watch and work behind the scenes.

Hard-hitting and professional reporting by the Univision team allows Latinos and other viewers to know that our community has a pulse–and a powerful one at that. If you are interested in pursuing a career in journalism or following in the footsteps of María, you can start immersing yourself in journalism by becoming an intern at a news station, taking back-stage tours of media stations, or even asking about shadowing opportunities.

Immerse Yourself

There are opportunities you can take a hold of to experience what goes on at their news stations. Victoria A. Perez interned at Univision’s station in El Paso, Texas. She carried out diverse tasks from answering phone calls to working with the cameras and news anchors. Her most rewarding moments included writing stories that were then broadcast on the weekend news programs.

To find out more about what internship opportunities are available, contact your local media stations or visit your school’s campus and see if they work out internship positions with students and your local Univision station.

buy cialis without prescription

cialis price

cialis dosage

Viagra online