Quince DIY Projects

For those quince girls trying to plan a quinceanera on a budget, do-it-yourself projects can help keep you within budget.  Save money by making your own decorations, accessories and party items. Become a crafty chica and get your hot glue gun ready. Follow these easy DIY steps to create a memorable and personalized quince celebration.

Bouquet:
Make your own flower decorations.
Supplies: Flowers, tule, ribbon, feathers, paper towel cardboard.
Steps: Insert flowers into a paper towel roll and glue it into place with hot glue. Add tule, ribbon and feathers to make the bouquet stand out and look more full. Wrap the paper towel roll with ribbon.

boutquet2

Toast Glasses: 
Decorate glasses for your toast by writing an XV with glitter glue.
Supplies: Glasses, glitter glue, ribbon, tule and decorations
Steps: Decorate the base with tule, ribbon and small decorations.

classes

Last Doll:
Use an old Barbie doll as your last doll to give to a younger sibling or cousin during the quince ceremony.
Supplies: Ribbon, tule and Barbie doll.
Steps: Wrap tule around the Barbie with the color theme of your party. Use tule to create a fancy dress for your doll.

last doll

XV Decorations:
To decorate the walls or entrance of the quince party ballroom, make a large collage in the shape of XV.
Supplies: Foam board, scissors, pictures, decorations
Steps: Cut out a large X and V out or 15 out of foam board. Decorate the foam board with pictures that show your favorite memories. Add decorations.

   Quince Decorations

Money Box:
Use a shoebox to create your own money box for cards and gifts.
Supplies: Shoebox, scissors, glue, tissue paper, decorative wrapping paper or fabric.
Steps: Cut a slot at the top of the shoebox. Wrap it with tissue paper or wrapping paper. Add decorations to personalize it.

moneybox

Guest Book:
Turn a composition book into a guest book that will capture the memories and messages of your friends and family members.
Supplies: Composition book,tissue paper, fabric, decorations, scissors, glue
Steps: Wrap the composition book with tissue paper or fabric coordinating with the color of your party. Glue it into place and add decorations.

guestbook

 

Inspired by Twitter

It is easy to get bogged down on Twitter by the negativity that flies around sometimes. Maybe you check twitter first thing and the morning and you see the latest twitter battle between celebrities. Who wants to start their day that way?

Twitter_logo_blue

Twitter connects us with people all over the world. More than a third of young adults under the age of 30 are using the social media site, according to data collected by the Pew Research Center. The percentage of Latinos on twitter has seen more growth than any other group in the past two years. Some of us have done some amazing things and Twitter is a great way to share our accomplishments. Check out some of these amazing Latina women and the great things they are doing. What’s a better way to start your day than with a dose of inspiration?

Maria Teresa Kumar – @mariateresa1

Maria Teresa Kumar is no stranger to Twitter. As the president of Voto Latino, she uses social media and texting campaigns to empower young Latinos to go out and take charge of their government. Her own personal Twitter is just as motivating. She often tweets about issues passing through Congress that we should all be aware. She is great at picking out some inspirational quotes as well.

Ana Roca Castro – @anarc

Ana is an education tech developer and the CEO of PreK12Plaza, an education resource helping students in underserved areas receive a quality bilingual education. Her twitter account shows her passion for education rights and bringing more women into the science and technology fields. She is also a founder of LATISM or Latinos in Social Media, an online movement to bring together Latinos on social media platforms in order to open a discourse for social change. Visit her Twitter and join the conversation.

Cristina Saralegui – @cristinaopina

Cristina is often called the Latina Oprah. She is a Cuban-born talk show host and journalist. She has interviewed countless celebrities and even some political figures. She shows just how far a Latina woman can get with some determination. Always the journalist, she often shares inspiring stories over on her Twitter account.

Maribel Marmol – @food4thoughtnyc

Maribel is a health blogger from New York City. She tweets about food, healthy living, and ways we can stay positive in life. Find out how to cheer up and avoid stress in the first place. Not only is her Twitter feed uplifting, but she is also a great example of ways we can all use our social media accounts to send a positive message to the world.  Check out her account to pick up some ideas on how you can follow her lead and tell the world about your passion.

America Ferrera – @americaferrera

America is young, talented, and a very vocal activist for Latino issues. She has supported over a dozen charities including Peace First, Stand UP to Cancer, and Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund. In addition, she has spoken at rallies for immigration reform and rights. She finds time for all of this while working as an actress!  Keep up with the excitement on her Twitter page.

If you still need more inspiring women in your life, check out the #Latism hashtag. You can find Latinos sharing their opinions and discussing ways to solve social and economic problems. LATISM holds weekly twitter parties every Thursday with a different topic each week. Young voices are always welcome and can offer a fresh perspective. So go ahead and tell the world what you think! Twitter can be inspiring and you can be one of the many Latinas that makes it that way.

DIY: Organizing your Jewelry

5502050-1Written by Priscilla Moctezuma

Accessorizing is a girl’s best friend! Organizing your cute jewelry doesn’t mean having to buy expensive containers. These DIY jewelry organizers are easy, simple, quick, and under $20.00 or less. It is fun and anyone can help you do it.

Necklace Organizer
This cute DIY  includes the use of power tools, so ask your parents or an adult for help!

Supplies:  1 Piece of wood, Acrylic Paint (choose a color) & Foam Brush, Drill, Sander, 10 hooks & 2 clips/latches

First, sand around the piece of wood with the sander — this includes the edges including the edges. Second, apply the acrylic paint with the foam brush on the wood of the desired color you’ve chosen. Next, allow the wood to dry. After the paint dries you can get creative and write a small quote on the top corner or you can always paint on a design. Third, you’ll need to drill in the 10 hooks in the middle or bottom. Just be sure you leave about ½ inch of space in between each hook to allow the necklaces to hang freely. Last, drill or hammer in the clips/latches at the back of the wood and hang it up!

Another necklace organizer — seriously, you can never have too many necklaces.

Supplies: Hammer, Curtain rod, Shower curtain hooks

This DIY is very simple and quick. First, you hammer in where you want to place your curtain rod. Second, put the shower curtain hooks on the rod and allow 1 inch of space in between each hook. Last, place necklaces on the heavier side of the hook to balance out. By the way, you could also use it as a bracelet organizer as well, just don’t add on the second step.

Earring Frame Organizer
Supplies: Picture Frame, Chicken Wire, and Picture Hanging Strips

First, buy a cheap, old picture frame and spray paint it the color you want it to be. Second, cut out the chicken wire to fit the frame. Then, put the chicken wire in first with the rest of the frame. Last, flip the picture frame over and stick on the picture hanging strips along the edges of the frame. Then,  stick it against the wall. Viola! You’ve created your very own earring organizer!

 Storage drawer Earring Organizer

Supplies: Plastic storage drawer, foam, and paint.

In this DIY, if you already own storage boxes, skip the first step. First, you will need to buy the amount of storage drawers you need to fit the amount of earrings you own. Second, cut the foam it to fit the size of the drawer and fill it in. Last, insert your earrings. Prefect way to sort your earrings.

Real Talk About Your Self-Esteem

Latinitas share their self-esteem advice, thoughts on true beauty, ideas on how media impacts girls and their confidence tips.

How does media negatively impact girls’ body image?
Media affects girls by making them think they are not pretty enough or that they are not wearing a pretty size and it makes girls want to change themselves in the wrong way.
-Jacklyn, Nicole & Kayla

 

Why is it important to have a good body image?

 

  • So they don’t have to feel bad about themselves.
  • So you could stay healthy.
  • So young teenage girls won’t self abuse themselves because they think they are ugly or hideous.
  • They will be happy with themselves and love life and not hate it.
  • So they could think good things about themselves and not think they are not pretty.
  • So they won’t lower their self-esteem.

-Destiny, Kendrea, Desiree, Julia, Lanal

 

What are the negative consequences of having a low self-esteem?

  • Harming yourself
  • Feeling less confident
  • Thinking low of yourself
  • Being angry
  • Feeling depressed and unpleasant.

-Layla, Ashley, Alex, Iris, Savanna

 

Why do you think photoshopping model photos is bad?

  • Because if they don’t like your picture they change it.
  • Because it is not the real you.
  • Even if you think you are pretty, they change you up.
  • You don’t look the same.

-Nevaeh, Chriss, Katelyn, Nicole

 

Do you think altered photos can hurt girl’s self-esteem?

  • It is awful because they don’t look that way and girls wish they were them.
  • It makes me angry because we want to be appreciated for who we are and not just what we look like.
  • It makes girls sad because they don’t appreciate how they look.
  • It makes girls sad because they don’t actually look that way.

-Avan, Dyani, Aileen

 

Why is it important not to compare yourself to models?

  • Because you are beautiful the way you are
  • You should just be yourself all the time
  • Models aren’t perfect they just use photoshop.

-Ayla & Amanda

 

What would you tell a friend if she wasn’t confident in herself?

  • To believe in yourself
  • To think positive
  • Don’t listen to other negative opinions
  • Be who you are

-Natalie, Alyssia, Natalia

 

What advice do you have to help girls boost their self-esteem?

  • Remember people don’t all look the same.
  • You are pretty in your own way.
  • We should focus on the brain and not just the body.
  • You are perfect the way you are.
  • You don’t need makeup to look perfect. You are beautiful the way you are.
  • Everyone is different.
  • We can’t all be models.
  • Say positive things about yourself.
  • Remember a lot of the models are photoshopped and don’t look that way for real.

-Amree, Tatiana, Johnnie, Diamond

Remembering El Chavo Del Ocho

It’s difficult trying to describe the nostalgic bliss that comes whenever I hear the “El Chavo’s” theme song on TV. The appropriately titled song, “The Elephant Never Forgets” by Jean Jacques Perrey, can take whoever grew up with the series back to their childhood. Forty years after El Chavo Del Ocho’s inception, it continues to warm the hearts of Spanish-speakers. Following the recent death of Roberto Gómez Bolaños, the creator of El Chavo Del Ocho, we decided to review the different aspects that make this show so magical.

The History of the Show:

El Chavo Del Ocho was a Televisa-produced thirty minute sitcom that aired from 1973-1980. The show featured the antics of the orphan El Chavo and company in their fictional home of the “vecendida,” which was a low-income housing unit. El Chavo was an eight-year-old boy that liked to hang out inside a barrel. Around him, the characters would have their storylines. The composition of the El Chavo Del Ocho differed from other family-oriented shows because the children were impersonated by adults. Regardless of acting choices, the actors were wonderfully over the top. The kids would throw throw tantrums, act out, act envious, etc.. The adults would fall in love, teach the children a lesson, or annoy the children.

The character “El Chavo” was first introduced in 1971 on The Chespirito Show. The series and character was created by Roberto Gómez Bolaños (A.K.A. “Chespirito”). Even though the other characters that Chespirito had created were popular, the first sketch that featured El Chavo, La Chilindrina, and Don Ramón was revolutionary. The sketch used a low-income fictional housing unit, the vecendidad, as its stage. This scene resonated more with underprivileged families than the popular soap-operas of the day did because soap operas were often portrayed Anglo-Saxon actors whose struggles were solely exclusive to the upper class.

When Bolaños was offered the chance to introduce “El Chavo” as a thirty-minute television show to the public in 1973, he ended his variety show. El Chavo Del Ocho was then made into the well-known sitcom. From there Chespirito (as El Chavo) produced the show’s content alongside Florinda Diaz (Doña Florinda), Ramón Valdés (Don Ramón), Carlos Villagrán (Quico), María Antonieta de las Nieves (La Chilindrina), Rubén Aguirre (Señor Jirafeles), Édgar Viva (El Señor Barrage), and Angelines Fernández (Doña Clotilde).

Over the course of seven years, eight seasons, and two hundred and ninety episodes El Chavo Del Ocho ended it’s television run. However it to continued to exist within Latino popular culture by syndication, that means it was put on reruns. The show has been syndicated since 1992 and according to Forbes Magazine the show has earned an estimated $1.7 Billion in syndication fees as of 2012.

Animated for a New Generation:

El Chavo Del Ocho’s magic was also brought into the new millennial by it’s animated spin-off, El Chavo Animado. The show started in 2006 and has produced seven seasons and 139 episodes. It featured all the characters animated, with the exception of la Chilindrina. The reason for this is that María Antonieta de las Nieves, the actress who portrayed the character, believed that she had a legal claim to the character. Since this dispute couldn’t be settled, Chespirito replaced her with Popis, Quico’s cousin who is portrayed by Florida Díaz.

There are many fans of El Chavo Del Ocho throughout the world. It was a large hit within the Spanish-speaking countries from Latin America, South America, Mexico, Spain, and some parts of the United States with predominately Hispanic roots.

Growing Up with El Chavo:

Even though I haven’t taken the time to watch an episode of El Chavo Del Ocho recently, I can bust out the lyrics to “Que. Bonita Vecindad” on cue. This show has had a large effect on me while growing up. I used to try to imitate Quico’s or the Chilindrina’s brattiness just for fun. That is what happens when you’re raised in a Mexican-American household in the 1990s. My first language was Spanish. I watched dubbed versions of cartoons in Spanish. El Chavo Del Ocho was one of the few shows that I watched that was made for the language that I was used to. It was also the first show that made me interested in satire.

It’s crazy that even though I was born in 1995, fifteen years after the show had ended, reruns of the show caused me to have a similar connection that my parents had with the show. I asked my mom to comment on the show’s effect on her life and she said this.

“I was raised with this show as it was going on. There have been people in my life whom I’ve related to Don Ramón, or Quico. When I was ten, I dressed up as la Chilindrina, and won the best costume award. This show is loved in Mexico. It might be called the Mexican-version of The Brady Bunch except that it is still applicable to other Spanish-speaking generations.

El Chavo Del Ocho is one of the most wonderful shows of all time. Regardless of generational gaps, Spanish-speakers continue to love this show by it’s running gags, quirky characters, and emotional stories. It’s a shame that Roberto Gómez Bolaños passed away on November 28, 2014, at the age of 85. His art as a comedian influenced many generations of Spanish-speaking individuals. When it was first shown, this show practically raised my parents. Through syndication, people like me got to experience the magic for themselves. And, through creation of the animated version of the show these characters will continue to amuse more generations of Latinos. El Chavo Del Ocho will always be able to can make us feel like kids again.

Growing Up in San Elizario

Growing up in the small town of San Elizario, that has recently become a city of its own, was definitely a  great experience. It serves as an escape from the “city life” and you’re allowed to have a pet horse in your backyard! Located near the border of Texas, New Mexico and Mexico, San Elizario is just about 20 minutes away from the El Paso city limits. Anywhere you go there is always a chance that you will bump into someone you know.

San Elizario History

San Elizario is home to much history including the San Elizario Chapel which was originally a presidio established by Spaniards. According to the San Elizario Genealogy and History Society, “the Spanish military had established a fort about thirty miles east of Los Tiburcios (near present day Fort Hancock, Texas) which they had named San Elceario, in honor of the Catholic Church’s saint and a patron of the military. 1700‘s - In 1789 they relocated the military base to the Hacienda de Los Tiburcios to protect the residents from the Apaches. With the help of the local people, the military built a large presidio (garrison). A chapel was built inside the presidio to serve the military and their families. From El Presidio de San Elceario, soldiers traveled in various directions to wherever their services were needed. A town grew around the Presidio.”

Park: Across from the church is the local park where many citizens go to as soon as the afternoon hits. From running to playing soccer match, or shooting a basketball with friends.

Art & Culture: The then presidio is now home to art galleries where local artists sell and exhibit their art work including painters, sculpture’s, and a boot maker! It is known as a National Historic District and home to the first jail in San Elizario now the Old El Paso County Jail Museum. It also includes a Veteran Memorial Museum and Los Portales Museum and Information Center located by the Plaza in front of the church.

Food: El Bandido-Restaurant and Bar is just toward the left of the Old El Paso County Jail Musuem.

Staying proud and local San Elizario also has its own supermarket which is said to have begun as only a fruit stand and has expanded its stores to neighboring towns such as Fabens, Texas.

Of course if the craving for “Azadero” cheese needs to be fulfilled the best place to go is Licon Dairy Farm where a bag can be purchased for just four dollars!

Charity: Local organizations help and donate to the food bank in San Elizario at 1444 Main St helping plenty of families by receiving bags of food every Thursday.

Attractions:  You can also visit the Licon Dairy Farm petting zoo and feed friendly goats, llamas, or a camel and  run from ducks or perhaps relax and catch a catfish at their fishing pond.

Events: The Historic District has events year round, from free tours, to ghost tours at night, art markets, reenactments and plays.

A variety of activities are available and an escape from the busy city life can be had by walking or taking a run out on the edge of town by cotton fields. Nearby is the Tigua Recreation and Wellness Center in Socorro, Texas where a gym is available and concerts are also held.

Its a great place to live and relax.

Journalist Zita Arocha

Zita Arocha

Zita Arocha

 Zita Arocha is a Cuban-American bilingual journalist and senior lecturer in the University of Texas At El Paso. She is director of Borderzine.com, a multimedia web magazine that prepares Hispanic college journalists for jobs in 21st century newsrooms. For over 20 years, she worked as a reporter for The Washington PostThe Miami Herald, The Miami News and The Tampa Times. She was executive director of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists from 1993-1997, and was training coordinator for the Freedom Forum’s Chips Quinn Scholars Program from 2000-2002. She has also been a freelance contributor to various national publications.

What are your job responsibilities?
Right now, I am the director of an online magazine called Borderzine.com and also, I teach some of the Journalism courses.

What is your educational training?
I always wanted to be a teacher, but life had other things prepared.  My first job was at the Tampa Time and later I went to work at El Nuevo Harold in Miami. In the first newspaper I applied as a secretary, because there weren’t any current positions open. I waited a season. Finally one reporter quit his job, and I applied for it. My boss at that time taught me what I know now. He was my mentor and a big support of my career. I have also worked at the Washington Post and The Miami News.

How did you find your current job?
I was invited to teach at UTEP in 2002. I had come to El Paso years before and I thought that it was a nice place to live. Dr. Weatherspoon had made me the invitation to come to the university and teach communication. I felt so glad, because I studied to be a teacher and that opportunity came to me at the right moment. Also, I am the current director of Borderzine Magazine at UTEP and is for Hispanic journalist pursuing an opportunity in the journalism.

How did you prepare for this career?
Honestly, your daily work prepares you for your career. I earned a master’s degree in English and comparative literature from the University of South Florida, and recently I earned a MFA in bilingual creative writing at UTEP. My most recent job has been a memoir, Leaving Cuba.

What is your favorite part of the job?
My favorite part is seeing bright new students each semester. Also, there is always something new to do, to learn and even to write. I like that my students get engaged in communications. We see them now everywhere and I believe that in the communication area you never will get bored.

What is the most challenging part of the job?
I remember when I used to write stories from the court rooms, I would get chills of the cases I used to hear. It is one of the parts about my job, which I most enjoyed. Being there, in the middle of all those sometime terrible, great and inspiring jury verdicts. Reporting those cases was something that I will always remember. I even enjoy telling them to my students or even to someone that is interviewing me, like you.

What do you do for fun when you aren’t working?
Most of my time I spend it at school. But, like on the weekend I spend the time with my husband at our house. We are common people that do common things.

Latina Authors You Should Know About

Julia de Burgos was a Puerto Rican poet who lived from February 17, 1914 to July 6, 1953. In addition to being a poet she was an advocate of Puerto Rico Independence and a civil rights activist for women and Afro-Caribbean writers. A celebrated poet, her most famous poem was “El Río Grande de Loíza” in where she personifies the river as a liberator. Julia de Burgos even had a position of power as the Secretary General of the Daughters of Liberty within the Puerto Rican Nationalist Party.

 

Pat Mora is a writer of poetry, nonfiction and children’s books and an advocate of childhood literacy in Spanish speaking communities. She was born in January 19, 1942 in El Paso, TX. She got a a Master of Arts from The University of Texas at El Paso and has obtained two Honorary Doctorates from North Carolina State University and the University of Buffalo. Her works are often themed at addressing Mexican American border relations.

 

Julia Alvarez is a Dominican-American writer who has received critical acclaim by her memoire book, “How the García Girls Lost their Accents” (1991). She was born in New York on March 27, 1950, however she was raised in Dominican Republic for the first ten years of her life. She came from a wealthy family and was forced to relocate when her family participated in a failed attempt to overthrow the dictator Rafael Trujillo. She received her Masters from Syracuse University in 1975. Her writing style includes a hybrid of English and Spanish words and her literary works are themed of assimilation and incorporation. For this she is highly regarded as one of the most important Latina writers from the 20th century.

 

Sandra Cisneros is a Mexican-American writer who is mostly known for her critically acclaimed coming-of-age novel, “The House on Mango Street” (1984). She was born on December 20, 1964 in Chicago, Illinois. While growing up, her family kept close transnational ties with family members from Mexico, for this reason she always found it hard to assimilate or to connect with one sole culture. She received her Bachelors from Loyola University in 1976 and her Masters of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa in 1978. Her books have helped young Mexican-Americans find the best cultural identification in a world that only allows them to pick one.

 

Isabel Allende is a Chilean-American novelist and short-story writer who is well-known for her magic-realist themed books like “The House of the Spirits” (1982) and “City of Beasts” (2002). She was born on August 2, 1942 in Lima, Peru to Chilean parents. Her father was at the time of her birth the second Secretary of the Chilean Embassy. When she was three, her father was kidnapped. Her mother then moved Allende’s siblings and her to Santiago, Chile. Her mother then remarried a future Chilean ambassador of Argentina. Isabel Allende was a well-read woman who knew how to speak English and Spanish. She married young and had two children. Isabel Allende’s daughter passed away in 1992 due to rare enzyme disorder. She wrote her heartbreaking narrative “Paula” in her daughter’s honor.

 

Gabriela Mistral was a Chilean poet, diplomat, educator and feminist. She was born Lucila Godoy Alcayaga on April 7, 1889. She was raised in a small and poor Andean village in Montegrande, and was taught at school by her oldest sister. After the formal education was completely she was allowed to become a teacher in 1900. At fifteen years old, she fell in love with a railway worker who later killed himself. This affected the nature of her poetry for the rest of her life. She climbed up the latter as an educator and poet and in 1921, she defeated the incumbent of the Radical Party, Josefina Dey del Castillo. Mistral was then named Director of Santiago’s Liceo. In addition to her time in public service she wrote two Poetry anthologies. She was the first Latin-American and fifth woman to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. Gabriela Mistral passed away in January 10, 1957.

 

Denise Chavez is an Mexican-American playwright. She was born on November 8, 1953 in Las Cruces, NM. She received her Bachelors from New Mexico State University and Masters of Fine Arts from Trinity University. Her most notable play is Novitiates (1971). Denise Chavez received the Rockefeller Playwright Fellowship in 1985.

 

Ana Castillo is a Chicana writer. She was born to Mexican-American parents on June 15, 1953 in Chicago, Illinois. Her works often depict Socio-Political commentary on race and gender. Ana Castillo’s first book “The Mixquiahuala Letters”, received critical acclaim with a Carl Sandburg Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in fiction and poetry.

 

Esmeralda Santiago is a Puerto Rican novelist, activist, and former actress. She was born on May 17, 1948 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Esmeralda Santiago’s book “When I was Puerto Rican” (1993) which detailed her home life in Puerto Rico.

Social Activist Dolores Huerta

Did you know that…

Activist and labor leader, Dolores Huerta has dedicated her life to working to improve social and economic conditions for farm workers and to fight discrimination. She was born Dolores Fernandez on April 10, 1930, in Dawson, New Mexico. She grew up in Stockton, California in the San Joaquin Valley. In 1960, she co-founded the United Farm Workers (UFW) with Cesar Chavez.

In the early 1950s, she completed a teaching degree at Delta Community College. She worked as an elementary school teacher where she saw that her students living in poverty without enough food or the basic necessities. To help, she became one of the founders of the Stockton chapter of the Community Services Organization (CSO) to improve social and economic conditions for farm workers and to fight discrimination.

To further her cause, Huerta created the Agricultural Workers Association (AWA) in 1960.  In 1962, she co-founded a workers’ union with Cesar Chavez, which was later called the United Farm Workers (UFW). Huerta was instrumental in the union’s successes, including the strikes against California grape growers in the 1960s and 1970s.

She has received many honors for her activism, including the Ellis Island Medal of Freedom Award (1993), the National Women’s Hall of Fame (1993) and the Eleanor Roosevelt Award (1998). In May 2012, President Barack Obama awarded Dolores Huerta with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest honor a civilian can receive.

Huerta is president of the Dolores Huerta Foundation, which she founded in 2002.The Dolores Huerta Foundation is a ”community benefit organization that organizes at the grassroots level, engaging and developing natural leaders. DHF creates leadership opportunities for community organizing, leadership development, civic engagement, and policy advocacy in the following priority areas: health & environment, education & youth development, and economic development. Huerta continues to work tirelessly developing leaders and advocating for the working poor, women and children.

Immigrant Heritage

Our nation has a long history of immigrants who have come to this country to seek new opportunities and to contribute their talents. These talented Latina immigrants have excelled in their field and demonstrated the potential of immigrants reaching their dreams.

Carolina Herrera (Venezuela)

Carolina Herrera was born in Caracas, Venezuela in 1939. Her full name is Maria Carolina Josefina Pacanins. Since 1980, she has run a thriving fashion business centered around her designer clothing line that has won awards and recognition for its elegant, feminine lines. The longtime resident of New York, she has regularly been recognized in the media as one of the city’s most elegant women.

Carmen Castillo (Chile)
She came to the U.S. from her native Spain with a student visa. She became the founder and owner of SDI International Corp., a global technology services corporation which serves many Fortune 500 companies. Since she was six years old, Castillo wanted to own her own business. She credits her success to being proactive. “We really have to figure out what’s going to be next,” she says in her bio. “The difference between us and most of our competitors is that we are truly global suppliers. You have to be a true global player to be able to hold and sustain a contract with a Fortune 100 company.”

Cristina Saralegui (Cuba)

Cristina was born on Jan. 29, 1948, in Havana, Cuba and immigrated to the U.S. in 1960. She studied publishing in college. In 1979, she became the editor in chief of Cosmopolitan en Español. She moved to TV in 1989 as the host of The Cristina Show. Her talk show stayed on the air until 2009. Saralegui now hosts a weekly radio program.

Sofia Vergara (Colombia)

Sofia Vergara was born in Barranquilla, Colombia on July 10, 1972. She worked as a model before relocating to the U.S. to pursue an acting career. She was a TV host of programs on Univision. She started acting in films and became most popular in recent years for her role as Gloria Delgado-Pritchett on the hit sitcom Modern Family. She has earned Emmy and Golden Globe nominations. She has also had acting roles in Happy Feet Two, The Smurfs and Chef.

Salma Hayek (Mexico)

Born on September 2, 1966, in Coatzacoalcos, Veracruz, Mexico, Salma Hayek was raised in a well-to-do Catholic home by her a Spanish mother and Lebanese father before she found fame in Hollywood. She got her big break in the entertainment industry after appearing in Robert Rodriguez’s Desperado. The actress has played in a wide range of roles on film, including her portrayal of Frida Kahlo in the biopic Frida (2002) and her work as the love interest of Antonio Banderas’ character in the animated film Puss in Boots (2011).

Penelope Cruz (Spain)

Penelope Cruz was born in Spain in 1974. She studied classical ballet at a young age. Penelope moved to Hollywood to pursue acting. She soon landed roles starring with Matt Damon and Tom Cruise. She became the first Spanish actress to win an Academy Award for her performance in the film Vicky Christina Barcelona. Cruz married her Vicky Cristina Barcelona co-star, Spanish actor Javier Bardem, in 2010.

 

buy cialis without prescription

cialis price

cialis dosage

Viagra online