Meaning of Dia de los Muertos

1In Latin America, November 1st and 2nd are dedicated to honor those who have passed away. This tradition dates back to pre-Hispanic times before the arrival of the Europeans to the Americas and comes from the views and beliefs the indigenous had of death. The indigenous people of Mesoamerica believed that the passing away of someone was the start of a journey to Mictlán, the underworld. During the burials, the family of the deceased, would include the tools or objects they had used during their life as well as other objects that would help them during their journey to Mictlán.

Upon the arrival of the Europeans, these indigenous traditions mixed with their own belief of All Saints Day on November 1st. The synchronization of cultures brought what we know today as Día de los Muertos.

One of the main characteristics used now during the Day of the Dead is that of the altars made for our loved ones who have passed away. Those who form part of this tradition believe that their loved ones return during these days and the altars provide them with personal items as well as items that will aid them in their journey.

The altars are beautifully decorated, full of color, flowers and candles as well as other objects, all with very specific meanings and purpose.

They are traditionally of 3 specific levels: Those with 7 levels represent the 7 steps the soul has to go through in order to reach spiritual peace.The Aztecs believed there were 7 different destinies a soul could have. Those altars with 3 levels represent heaven, earth and the underworld, and two levels represent heaven and earth.

Each altar is also decorated with other typical items:

  • A photograph of the person who’s altar is made for is usually presented in the center.
  • Water is included to quench the thirst of the souls who visit after their long journey. It also represents pureness of the soul.
  • Candles are used to guide the souls to the altar.
  • Incense is used to purify the energy around the altar and many believe it keeps the bad spirits away.
  • Salt is also added to bring purity.
  • Flor de cempazuchitl or flor de muerto (marigold flower) is highly symbolic of this tradition and is used to decorate the altars, many times in the shape of an arc, a pathway or even a cross. These flowers are used to guide the spirits into our world. They were also used by the Aztecs who they believed their smell would bring back the spirits.
  • Papel Picado also decorates altars. These often have intricate designs of Calaveras or other shapes and symbols. They add color to the altar and some believe it is the connection between life and death.
  • Food and drinks, specially those who the deceased enjoyed during life are also part of the altar and of course all made for the spirit to enjoy. These dishes can also be the traditional meals of that time and place.
  • Pan de muerto, typical of these traditions is also present as well as a cross, many times made out of cempazuchitl flowers. These two elements represent the incorporation of the Catholic religion into these indigenous practices.
  • Altars also include sugar skulls which are decorated very colorful and are one of the most popular traditions during these celebrations.
  • Toys are often seen on altars as well if the spirit who is visiting is that of a child.
  • And many times little dog figurines are added to altars, which the indigenous people believed they served as companions to the souls who were on their journey.

During these days public places such as schools are filled with altars made for loved ones who have passed away, or even famous individuals who represent a culture or a cause. Many people make their altars at home or decorate cemeteries with some of these items. These altars form a connection not only to an ancestral past but also to those who are no longer with us. It is a way to remember them, remember our indigenous culture and a very distinct way of thinking about death.

Diversity is Strength

I believe that diversity is strength.

Growing up in an upper middle-class town in West Hartford Connecticut, I was often ashamed of my cultural background. Going to magnet schools all my life, I was surrounded by peers that lived very privileged lives. Designer bags, personal chefs, and the concept of weekly “allowance” were material norms that seemed to be expected. My parents are Colombian immigrants, speak Spanish, and have traditional Colombian values. They have worked hard all of their lives in order to provide us with food, education, and a home to live in. Often working two or three jobs each, they dedicated their lives to obtaining the American dream of their children to have a better life in America. The food, the music, and the cultural values were all left at home. I didn’t acknowledge them when I was with my friends at school.                                   

  “Colombia? What part of Mexico is that from?”

Growing up I didn’t understand why I was different. I didn’t understand why I wasn’t tall blonde and skinny. I didn’t understand why I couldn’t have a coach bag in middle school. I didn’t understand the value of being different. I would dye and straighten my hair, dress a certain way, and talk like the rest of my peers in order to try to fit in and assimilate. I didn’t want to be known as the only Hispanic in the class. Going from educational institution to the next, I often received white privilege because of my appearance. The assumption that everyone was of rich, white, American background was an unspoken rule that the community had. But cultural studies have always fascinated me. I just didn’t understand my own. I didn’t understand who I was. I was either too American for my Colombian friends, or too exotic for my white friends.

When I spent a weekend in Barcelona, Spain while my travels abroad, I understood who I truly was. Barcelona was a beautiful city filled with Spanish culture. I stayed at a youth hostel in Barcelona that accommodated young travelers from around the world at cheap prices. Unpacking in my room, there was so much diversity in the people staying there. Beds filled with Russians, Romanians, Koreans, and American travelers all came together in that moment in time. Free tours were given every morning of different locations throughout the city.The weather was absolutely perfect. The sun illuminated all the beautiful details of the buildings and could see every carving the architected intended. Passing food trucks the waft of spices and grilled BBQ filled our noses. The commotion and bustle of beeping cars, people talking in Castilian, and the sounds of the exotic birds chirping made such a harmonious melody that seemed fit for the environment. Weaving in and out of markets I’d see the array of brightly colored fresh fruits and vegetables, and hand crafted trinkets available to purchase. It was something out of a movie. The new sights, sounds, and knowledge we obtained within that 2 hour tour was incredible. But that wasn’t the most impacting part of the experience.

During lunch, we were sent off to explore the great restaurants in the city. Absolutely starving from all the temptation of food we passed, a group of about ten of us decided to go to a restaurant nearby. A traditional Spanish aura was clearly preset in this restaurant. A tapa bar filled the far wall alongside the stacks of Spanish wines.  Sitting down, I was surrounded by an Australian couple, Norwegians, a group of Romanians, and myself. We all introduced ourselves and said where we were from. I told everyone I was from the states and was studying abroad in London. We then began telling stories of our travels, our past and what we had planned to do while in Barcelona. Once the waiter arrived to our table, he attempted to speak English to take our orders. When he came around to me, I spoke to him in Spanish to better understand him and to know what was in the meal I had. Complete shock filled both the waiters face and the rest of the groups face when they heard me speak fluent Spanish. The waiter enjoyed our conversation and offered the group bottomless sangria for the rest of the evening.

“Aren’t you American?”
“I am, but I am also Colombian. I am Colombian American”

That was probably the first time I identified myself as a Colombian American. Yes, I grew up in the United States, but I grew up in a Colombian household and was taught the values and morals that Colombians had. Having those customs allowed me to have a better experience while abroad because I was able to connect with people who had similar views and communicate with Spanish speakers. I was seen as a key asset in the group because I was able to haggle prices, ask directions, and understand the cultural norms of respect that the others didn’t. For example, in other parts of Europe it is common to snap twice at the waiter to get their attention. In Spain, it would be very disrespectful to snap at a waiter, and they would be very offended. Minute details like these had to be explained because of the difference in culture, and I was able to do that. That day, I had the most delicious paella I have ever tasted. The rice was baked to perfection. The seafood was so incredible fresh, and each bite was filled with different spices. During that lunch, time flew, conversations lasted, and friendships were made.

After lunch, I felt confident in my cultural background for the first time in my life. I knew that growing up differently allowed me to gain skills and values that others did not. Having an open mind, giving and receiving respect, and understanding the value of my culture made me rethink what I wanted to gain from my trip to Barcelona. I didn’t just want to spend what limited time I had clubbing or partying at the beach, as my friends wanted to. I wanted to dive deep into the Spanish culture and see a traditional flamenco show. I ditched the comfort of my American friends and went with my new Australian friends to see this show. I turned out to be a flamenco gypsy performance instead of the traditional dance. The sound of the familiar Spanish beats, dance moves and aroma of food brought me back to Christmas parties at home. By the end of the night the three of us were invited on stage to dance with the band. After the performance was done, the three of us stayed for a bit talking and enjoying the atmosphere. The band was packing up and came over to talk to us. Their English was a bit broken, but I told them in Spanish that we really enjoyed the show. We ended up talking for about an hour with the band of gypsy musicians and how historically they have been discriminated against in the city, but they aim to represent the misunderstood culture. I thought that was very inspirational and just solidified my journey of cultural self-acceptance during that trip.

Everyone is different. We all have stories to tell, wisdom to spread and life obstacles we must tackle. Culture is seen differently everywhere. But, the skills and values you take from them, is was truly counts. I have had my ups and downs with identifying who I am. I didn’t want to be categorized based on race growing up. My trip to Barcelona, brought me back to the motherland. The land in which history thrives, music is loud, and energy is embraced. Diversity is strength, and that is what I believe.

My Culture is Not a Costume!

My Culture is Not a Costume! The Deal on Cultural Appropriation

The leaves are changing hues, pumpkins are being sold on the side of the roads, children are preparing for their annual sugar high; this can only mean one thing: Halloween is creeping around the corner! And while the spooks of goblins, ghosts, and (fake) gore are traditionally expected this time of year, there is another horrid — and unfortunately, quite real — monster we most definitely rather shoo away.

Yes, chicas. This monster is called *cue the scream* cultural appropriation.

Dun, dun, dun, dun.

But have no fear! In this article, you will learn about this problematic trend, and you all will soon be anti-culture vulture queens.


What is cultural appropriation?
Cultural appropriation is when elements of a culture is adopted, worn, or mainstreamed by another culture. It’s extremely (and ignorantly) sought-after in pop culture, but more and more people, especially those who identifies as intersectional feminists, are understanding the negative concept of this “trend.”

Why is it bad?

Intentional or not, cultural appropriation is a form of racism. Not too long ago, teen actress Amandla Sandberg, who is African-American, called out white television personality Kylie Jenner for wear cornrows which she displayed in an Instagram selfie.

In Amandla’s words: “When you appropriate black features and culture but fail to use your position of power to help black Americans by directing attention towards your wigs instead of police brutality or racism…”

Her mature and insightful comment gained national notice. While a lot of people applaud Amandla, many labeled her as the offensive “angry black woman” stereotype. This is a perfect example of how cultural appropriation belittles the members of the culture being appropriated. Kylie is easily allowed to wear cornrows (she did again), while Amandla and other black women are discriminated for simply being themselves.

How does it affect the Latin@ community?
I’m pretty sure we’ve all seen a Halloween costume resembling the uniform of a Mariachi performer, a department store dress with indigenous patterns, or a white celebrity playing dress up and imitating Chola fashion.

But, what happens when a Latina identifies as and embraces Chola culture? What’s happens when an indigenous man or woman wear their customs in public? What happens when a Mexican musician is caught in their performance suit? Most likely, they will be mocked.

The issue is: our culture is not accepted in society until a mainstream brand declares it as vogue. And it’s only certain parts of our culture, like the pretty Aztec-inspired patterns or the colorful Dia de Los Muertos sugar skulls, but the people and history that formed these cultural customs are treated without dignity and respect.

Remember: You can appropriate, too.

In 2013 during the MTV Movie Awards, the beloved Mexican American cantante Selena Gomez staged her pop hit Come and Get It in a Bollywood-inspired performance which included accessorizing herself with a bindi, a sacred forehead decoration worn by Hindus. Although many of our readers and writers adore Selena, her actions were inexcusable, and she continues to be problematic (a year ago, she posted a picture on Instagram wearing a bindi and a traditional Indian sari, captioning “sari not sari”) despite members of the Hindu and Indian community asking for an apology, and most importantly, to stop.

Before you decide to wear a bindi, to decorate your hands with henna, to buy a kimono, to ask your stylist for dreadlocks, think: Is this my culture? How does this affect my friends in different communities than mine? How would I feel if someone from a different culture was wearing or using [insert your culture’s customs]? Chicas, your culture, as is everyone else’s, is unique and celebratory. Be you!

What do I do when I see cultural appropriation happening?
Speak out. Whether someone is a appropriating your culture or another’s, it’s important to educate society on the effects of cultural appropriation. Do not get discourage if someone chooses to ignore or disagree with your views because, sadly, it will happen. Instead, be glad if someone acknowledges your thoughts and recognizes their wrongdoings. You, your intelligence, and your words can make a difference.

History of Latina Feminism

Throughout history, women were often considered second-class citizens, lacking the right to vote and oftentimes valued predominantly for their ability to take care of a home and reproduce. It is only within fairly recent history that women in the Western Hemisphere have achieved some level of equality with men, demanding acknowledgement as autonomous human beings with minds and rights and goals. And while modern feminism as we know it may have its beginnings in white feminists, in many ways Latinas have taken up the mantle of the feminist cause. Non-Latina American feminists like Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton helped earn American women the right to vote in 1920 but But many Latin American feminists (i.e. Nisia Floresta and Lydia Cacho) soon followed suit, gaining females in their own countries similar recognition and opportunities. Fast forward to the present, there is a strong Latina presence in issues of female empowerment as various female political leaders work hard to prove their worth in a masculine arena. What’s more, female Latin America has now politically surpassed the United States in some ways.

But while the USA has yet to witness its first female president, one Latina in particular stands out in American politics as a prominent and powerful figure that will pave the way for future women. She is Sonia Sotomayor, a political powerhouse and a household name. Currently a Supreme Court Justice, she was born in the Bronx to Puerto Rican parents. Her father died when she was a child and her mother forced to raise her alone. But despite this childhood tragedy she went on to achieve greatness, graduating sumam cum laude from Princeton University and attending Yale Law School. Then in 2009 she achieved national fame when President Obama nominated her to Supreme Court, where she still resides as she oversees major national legislation. But while Sotomayor is certainly paving the way for future women in politics and providing them ample inspiration, multiple countries in Latin America have already seen their first female President.

Dilma Roussef, the current President of Brazil, is the country’s first woman to be elected to the position. As a young woman Dilma fought against a military dictatorship, risking her life when she was captured, jailed and tortured for her beliefs. Upon release she became involved in politics and quickly moved up the power-ladder. She was Chief of Staff for the preceding President until her election in 2011. She has seen her share of career ups and downs but is internationally credited with pulling Brazil out of an economic slump through her support of business entrepreneurship. In this way her leadership provided opportunity for countless Brazilians who were suffering financially.

In 2006 Chile also witnessed its first female elected president. In fact, Michelle Bachelet was the first female elected president in all of Latin America. She knew from a young age that her life goal was to help others cope with pain and improve national health. She originally thought she would become a doctor but political turmoil in Chile turned her focus towards politics. In fact when Pinochet, a dictator, took control of the country in 1973 Bachelet joined a revolt against him. She was discovered and jailed, tortured, and beaten for months. Somehow she emerged with her soul stronger than ever and determined to find a way to redeem Chile and its people. Flash forward to the present she is now serving her second presidential term after having served for a time as executive director of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women. Not only is Bachelet a remarkable person who endured great suffering, she actively works to promote female wellbeing in a country still marked by traditional machismo.

Argentina has seen not one but two female presidents. Isabel Perón [1974-1976] was the first female president of Argentina but she was not elected, simply assuming power because she was Vice-President when her husband Presidente Juan Perón died. The current President, Cristina Kirchner, is the first elected female president. Her first term, however, was marked with difficulties as she faced accusations of inflation and poor management of infrastructure and public security. In her current term she is facing charges in an alleged cover-up of a terrorist attack. In the case of Kirchner she does not present a fully uplifting example of female empowerment in the political arena: while figures like Sotomayor and Bachelet inspire other girls to achieve good, Kirchner presents a different lesson. Not only is it important to empower women and support their political successes, it is equally important to choose whom to support based on their character and record rather than on their gender alone.

In conclusion, Latina feminism is politically present and growing in both the United States and Latin America. The women who rise to power often do so despite obstacles and tragedies, proving that women can overcome any hardship and compete and win in male-dominated fields.  What’s more Latina feminism is still a work-in-progress and current Latinas chasing their dreams will one day be a part of the history of Latina feminism.

Language Discrimination

Photo Credit:

Photo Credit:

Research on Hispanic trends conducted by Pew Research Center in 2012 showed that 2nd and 3rd generation Latinos in United States do not always speak Spanish. In fact, Spanish proficiency diminishes significantly as generations increase. Of Latinos born to immigrant parents, 80% can carry on a conversation in Spanish, while over half of third-generation Latinos speak little or no Spanish. Percentages for reading in Spanish fall even lower. Yet despite the fact that more and more US-born Latinos are speaking less Spanish, discrimination against them by Spanish-speaking Latinos continues to persist.

Elisa, 23, is painfully familiar with this reality. She grew up in a small Texan town that consisted largely of Hispanics. She grew up with 2nd-generation Mexican-American parents, and while random Spanish words and phrases like ‘mija’ and ‘arroz con pollo’ peppered her family’s vocabulary, she did not actually speak the Spanish language. This caused problems with some other Latinos, however, when they discovered that although she looked typically Mexican and ate Mexican foods and celebrated Mexican holidays she did not know the language. Spanish-speaking kids at school would either tease her by calling her a “fake” Hispanic or accuse her of pretending not to speak Spanish so that she could seem “like a white girl.” Although Elisa went on to minor in Spanish in college, she suffers from anxiety when speaking it in front of native speakers. She can’t shake the irrational belief that they are inwardly mocking and judging her. “I can’t seem to get those childhood voices out of my head,” she says. “It’s sad because Spanish feels tainted for me now.”

On the other hand Raquel, 19, speaks Spanish very well. She is a first-generation American born to Mexican parents and she grew up speaking the language daily with family and friends and also visiting her parents’ Mexican hometown annually. But she is well aware of the tendency of Hispanics to judge one another’s language abilities. She says her cousins from Mexico like to correct her grammatical errors and laugh when her American accent twists Spanish words. “They aren’t trying to be mean,” she says. “It’s just a joke. But it does make me self-conscious sometimes.”

Raquel says she just reminds herself that speaking perfect Spanish is not what makes her Mexican or Latino. And she’s right: blood, heritage and history determine one’s cultural ethnicity and whether or not someone speaks the language does not heighten or diminish his/her roots. And as Latinos become more established in the United States their children and grandchildren become more assimilated into mainstream culture and less acquainted with the homelands of their forefathers. As a result not every Latino has the advantage of Spanish-speaking parents at home. At the same time Spanish is a vibrant and growing language in the United States and those who do speak it deserve to take pride in that. Nonetheless Latinos can both celebrate the Spanish language and acknowledge that Latinos are linguistically diverse: some speak much Spanish, some speak a little, and some none at all. There’s no reason to believe Latinos must be one certain way. What’s more, diversity among Hispanics is one of our most compelling qualities.

Quince DIY Projects

For those quince girls trying to plan a quinceañera on a budget, do-it-yourself projects can help keep you within budget.  Save money by making your own decorations, accessories and party items. Become a crafty chica and get your hot glue gun ready. Follow these easy DIY steps to create a memorable and personalized quince celebration.

Make your own flower decorations.
Supplies: Flowers, tulle, ribbon, feathers, paper towel cardboard.
Steps: Insert flowers into a paper towel roll and glue it into place with hot glue. Add tulle, ribbon and feathers to make the bouquet stand out and look more full. Wrap the paper towel roll with ribbon.


Toast Glasses: 
Decorate glasses for your toast by writing an XV with glitter glue.
Supplies: Glasses, glitter glue, ribbon, tulle and decorations
Steps: Decorate the base with tulle, ribbon and small decorations.


Last Doll:
Use an old Barbie doll as your last doll to give to a younger sibling or cousin during the quince ceremony.
Supplies: Ribbon, tulle and Barbie doll.
Steps: Wrap tulle around the Barbie with the color theme of your party. Use tulle to create a fancy dress for your doll.

last doll

XV Decorations:
To decorate the walls or entrance of the quince party ballroom, make a large collage in the shape of XV.
Supplies: Foam board, scissors, pictures, decorations
Steps: Cut out a large X and V out or 15 out of foam board. Decorate the foam board with pictures that show your favorite memories. Add decorations.

   Quince Decorations

Money Box:
Use a shoebox to create your own money box for cards and gifts.
Supplies: Shoebox, scissors, glue, tissue paper, decorative wrapping paper or fabric.
Steps: Cut a slot at the top of the shoebox. Wrap it with tissue paper or wrapping paper. Add decorations to personalize it.


Guest Book:
Turn a composition book into a guest book that will capture the memories and messages of your friends and family members.
Supplies: Composition book,tissue paper, fabric, decorations, scissors, glue
Steps: Wrap the composition book with tissue paper or fabric coordinating with the color of your party. Glue it into place and add decorations.



Actor Luis Guzmán



At the Hispanicize Conference in Miami, where Latinitas co-founders Alicia Rascón and Laura Donnelly won the 2015 Positive Impact Award, they got the chance to interview the well-known actor Luis Guzmán, recipient of the Latinovator Award at Hispanicize 2015. Read below for his conversation with Laura, in which he delves into his inspirational success story and offers young Latinas advice on how to be women of integrity.

We are trying to change Hollywood. How close are we?
We’re right there. Technology has changed so much. There is easier access to the public now. We have the power of Internet and you can record or do a video on your phone or make a podcast. There are so many different outlets to pass a message. Even just doing short movies and putting them on YouTube – that has such an impact. By having this impact we outside Hollywood can do all this stuff to have an impact, and empower young girls…

To become directors themselves, or writers, or graphic designers.
Yeah, anything is possible. Especially now on a laptop. You can build anything from that. You can build fabric, clothes, design, you name it. But also you hit play and it records and you can edit it right there. Something you do in five minutes can have an incredible impact on the whole world.

 Who is a female you admire that is taking Latino voices to new spaces?
I admire people like Rosario Dawson. She does a lot of work for the whole community. Rosie Perez too. They don’t only impact the female community but also act as role models. Rosario does a lot of work with the Lower East Side Girl Club [in New York City] and Voto Latino.

Tell us a little about how you got your first start and what inspired you to go into the field?
I was a social worker on the Lower East Side and one day a few of my kids didn’t show up to the program, so I went out into the street looking for them. I happened to run into a friend of mine who I hadn’t seen in a few years, and he told me he was writing for a TV show and they were coming to NY and were going be looking for people [to cast]. He gave me a phone number, so I called up, went in, and auditioned. I had no clue what I was doing.

Next thing I know, I am costarring on the season premiere of Miami Vice. But I still maintained my job as a social worker for awhile because I didn’t know anything about acting or the entertainment industry. And I was really dedicated and committed to empowering young people and getting them off of welfare, and giving them tools to go out and succeed in society. Basically the tools that I provided were questions. “Who are you? Where are you going? How are you going to get there? Where do you want to be six months from now? A year? Five years?” And I found out nobody ever asked them these questions. They were like: “Oh wow, I never even thought about that because nobody ever asked.” So when you provide people with those kinds of mental tools they refocus themselves.

I used to tell all the young people I worked with: “Think of yourself as a camera lens. Right now you’re really out of focus. My job is to help you help yourself get better into focus.” So that’s what I do and I still go back to where I used to work and I talk to the young people. It’s an important element of my life because though I love what I do as an entertainer and getting to travel the world it’s important to come back. Sometimes the young people there put me on a pedestal. I didn’t necessarily want to be on that pedestal, but they see someone who comes from the same place as them and succeeded. I have the ability to give people faith and to give people hope.

You’d be great in Latinitas! What advice do you want to give to the girls at Latinitas?
Believe in yourself, take pride in who you are, love yourself. Respect yourself as a woman. Don’t give into male domination. Be in control and let a boy know that ‘no’ does not mean ‘yes.’ And as far as bullying goes, because that’s a big thing, bullying is not the way to go. Protect each other from that. Unfortunately there are girls out there who don’t have the love, don’t have the support, so they choose suicide over enduring violence.

Tattoo Taboo in Latino Culture

sugar skull tat

Tattoos have long been a controversial subject, and often a social taboo. The reasons for their negative image are many, but mostly they stem from their historical association with criminal activity. They were oftentimes used to brand criminals, and sailors utilized them as well as a means of identification in case they were drowned and washed ashore somewhere. In more recent history, and nowadays, tattoos are intimately associated with gangs who use them to pledge loyalty by permanently imprinting gang symbols on their bodies.

In the US and parts of Latin America, however, this trend is changing as more and more young people are choosing to get tattoos for personal reasons. A poll conducted in 2012 by The Harris Poll showed that 1 in 5 American adults possess at least one tattoo. Approximately 15-20% percent of those tattooing are Hispanic. The majority of those interviewed in the poll were not gang members or criminals but rather chose to tattoo because they wanted to express a facet of their identity through body art.

Nonetheless, tattoos are still regarded negatively within the Latino culture. Parents of tattooed young people often react to their offspring’s decision with anger or even horror. Daphne, 23, a Mexican-American of immigrant parents, recalls the day her parents discovered a large tattoo on her ribcage. While her father was disappointed in her so-called “foolish choice” her mother was especially upset. “She was screaming and cursing and crying,” Daphne says. “She didn’t speak to me for months after that. She said this wasn’t how she raised me and I looked like I belonged in gang.” She and her mother finally reconciled, though her mother still can’t stand to see her tattoo. She believes her mother overreacted, but admits that after speaking to her mother about the issue she has come to understand a little better her reasons. Daphne’s mother is from Mexico, where currently gangs involved in drug cartels terrorize the country. The gangs are often recognizable by their symbolic tattoos, and for many who live in fear of gang violence they often try to spot danger by scanning questionable-looking individuals for their telltale tattoos.

Throughout Central America the attitude towards tattoos is based in similar realities. Candi, 26, grew up in Honduras and says that in her home country tattoos are also deeply connected to violent gangs that the people greatly fear. Having lived in the United States for a decade now she has one small tattoo on her wrist. “The attitude here is so different. Most people don’t have the same fear of gang violence so tattoos have a different meaning. They’re just art.”

So, because of the differences in ways of life in parts of Latin America versus in the United States, older-generation Latinos are often more wary of tattoos than cultures not currently entrenched in gang warfare. As shown by Daphne’s and Candi’s anecdotes tattoos often make them think immediately of dangerous gangs, while for those raised outside such fears tattoos are not so instantly threatening. Latinos raised in the US, while sometime having encountered gang activity, do not endure the national fear of violence by drug cartels, so their view of tattoos is not as extreme. It is easier for them to view tattoos as innocent works of art and self-expression. These differing experiences, however, have caused some disagreement between generations about the nature of tattoos. In the end it is important for those for and against tattoos to understand one another’s point of view. As far as the art of tattooing is concerned, its stigma will likely never disappear as long as gangs and criminals continue to use them for their own purposes.

Media’s Focus on the Female Physice


Watch out thin and slender body types, the curvy look is in this year. The popular hits from Nicki Minaj’s ‘Anaconda’ and Meghan Trainor’s ‘All About the Bass’ have made it known that having a big booty is beautiful and that curves are to be celebrated. The media has joined the cause with its input with whose body is rockin’ and what workouts these women do to keep their figure.

But why does it matter?

A woman’s body has become a public forum for opinion. Their shape and size have become an important factor in determining their beauty in society’s standards. Such views can be seen in the new popular dance fad – twerking. This dance focuses on the sensual booty shaking (the bigger the better) and has been prevalent in many performers’ dance routines.

In the 2014 MTV Video Music Awards, Chelsea Handler came onto the stage to present and made a joke about being surrounded by all these shapely women and being thankful that her entrance followed a Taylor Swift performance.

“They asked me if I wanted to perform at the VMAs and I said there are going to be a lot of big fat a**es at that awards show,” Chelsea said. “So I will present, but you have to put me up after someone who’s white. So thank you, Taylor Swift, for being so white!”

Taylor Swift has also received media attention for her body – rather unfavorable attention because of her lanky stature. With memes popping up all over the Internet, mocking her for her minimal curves, it has become clear that this mindset has seeped into those watching at home.

17-year-old high school senior, Vanessa Andrada, says she notices the female-physique emphasis in the media and feels it is worrisome for her generation that consumes it.

“I think the media focus primarily on how skinny a girl is or even now how curvy a girl is. Even curvy girls must have a ‘coca-cola’ type body to look attractive,” she says. “They focus on this way too much and it makes girls seem as if they have to live up to this standard to be considered beautiful.”

This body-centered attention, unfortunately, is fairly prevalent in Latina celebrities.

A study shows that Latina actresses are unrepresented on screen, but are most likely to be sexualized in their roles, according to a TIME article. Out of all women on screen, 37.5% of Hispanic actresses were most likely to be partially or fully naked on screen in 2013.

The curvaceous bodies of Eva Mendes, Sofía Vergara, Penelope Cruz, and Jennifer Lopez have all been the main attraction to their media coverage. The hype of the “curvy Latina” is accentuated and preserves a stereotype that isn’t really apparent in most Spanish women.

“Not all Latinas are curvy and it makes the less curvy women feel like they are not as beautiful as a curvy Latina,” Andrada says. “In some sense, if you don’t have the ‘curviness’ of a Latina you may consider yourself less beautiful than what you really are.”

Although statistics of eating disorders in minority women are unavailable – because of a historical bias that they only affect white women – one study found that of the leanest 25% of 6th and 7th grade girls, the Hispanic and Asian girls found the most dissatisfaction with their bodies, according to the National Eating Disorder Association.

“These factors do really impact the way girls see themselves! They hold themselves to what the media or even stereotypes consider as beautiful,” Andrada says.”That’s why many girls have low self-esteem now-a-days because we focus on trying to be the girl with flawless skin, a coca-cola body type, with no stretch marks and have no extra body fat.”

15-year-old Hannah Leija agrees that women shouldn’t have to face criticism for their body image. She shares that it is unfair that they are held to certain standards in the media and that it affects her peers. However, she refuses to succumb to these pressures with a positive outlook and confidence.

“The way I see myself is good,” she says. “I don’t care what the media has to say or what people think. I’m happy with the way I am.”

Women. Ladies. Girls. Latinas. Or non-Latinas. They all come in different shapes or sizes. Nicki Minaj and Meghan Trainor are right. You should celebrate your curves, but you should, also, celebrate whatever body type you may be.

So if you are a curvy Latina or a slender one, it doesn’t matter. Beauty is found with actions and not appearance.

Actress Mia Xitlali

Mia Xitlali is an actress, known for her roles in Max (2015), Selling Rosario (2014) and Flight (2015). Mia recently played the character Carmen in the movie Max that focuses on a dog that helped US Marines in Afghanistan. The movie follows Max on his adventures as he returns to the U.S. and is adopted by a family after suffering a traumatic experience. Mia talked to Latinitas about her experience on the movie set.


Latinitas: Where are you from?

Mia Xitlali: I am from Los Angele,s but I have Mexican roots on my mom side, she is from Guadalajara, Jalisco; and my dad is from El Paso, TX

L: What does Xitlali, means?

M: It means star in Nahuatl, which is a native language in Mexico.

L: Do you speak both English and Spanish well?

M: I speak better in English… Necesito practicar (I need to practice Spanish), but I am working on it.

L: When did you first know you wanted to become an actress?

M: I started acting since I was 7 years old. I started with small performances in plays. Because my family members were also involved, I decided that I wanted to follow my parents’ foot steps. I knew that I wanted to become an actress when I did my first play called South Pacific. I realized that the way I felt at that moment I just wanted to keep feeling it. It is the best feeling so far.

Did you have the opportunity to study acting or did it just come naturally?

M: My entire family is made up of performers. They are musicians and dancers. So, I just follow them. I learned it from both of my parent and also my tias, tios and cousins.

L: Which actress or actor would you like to work with in the future?

M: An actress who I would like to work with is Meryl Streep. She has been working constantly. She is always changing her style of acting and she is super good on what she does. I just want to be able to get awesome roles that she has had the opportunity to play in movies.

L: Can you tell us a fun fact about yourself?miaxitali

M: I am actually a dog whisper in real life. I mean I was also in the movie, but those scenes that I did with MAX where natural. I have conversations with dogs and they actually understand me. I play games with them and give them directions and they just follow them.

L: What is the best part of being an actress?

M: The best part is that I enjoy what I do. I love this amazing feeling and the rush.  I like knowing people and getting new experiences. I learn every day and it is just a great thing that I enjoy.

L: What is the scariest part of an audition?

M: It is not knowing what they are looking for.

L: Was was it like auditioning for the MAX movie?

M: On the MAX movie, I had to wait almost a month. I thought that I didn’t get the part. I thought I had to move on to the next casting call. After all that time of waiting they called me and got the part. It was pretty exciting.

L: What did you learn about playing Carmen in MAX movie?

M: She had a very though life and see was kick-off out of her dad’s house for getting a tattoo and at such as young age… I mean she was 14 years-old and to go through all of that she was brave and knew a new family that supported her.

L: Do you think that this movie is going to touch the hearts of those families who have a relative who are in the army?

M: I think yes. I recently saw that military families have the same situations as the ones that are shown on the screen. Some of them were crying or very emotional. MAX is a great movie. I think that it does have the power to touch people’s hearts and not just the ones that have a relative in this situation, but also many kinds of people.

L: Is the movie base on a true story?
M: It is based on a true story, actually it is a book. It did happen some time in the past, and it is about this dog hero.

L: Did you enjoy acting with a dog?

M: I did enjoy acting with him. He is just an awesome animal and beautiful. It was interesting because he was a very good actor, and I had so much fun being with him. His name is Carlos and he would follow me everywhere. It was so funny.

L: How do you feel that more Latinas are gaining roles in the Unites States?

M: I am very excited that I could actually be one of those Latinas that can make a change. I don’t know where I could be right now if I didn’t land this opportunity. I mean I am in the perfect time when I am 100% Latina and we need to take advantage of these kind of opportunities.

L: Did you gain more experience from you past work through now?

M: Yes, I have. I did the first film Selling Rosario, which was a short film and I did good on that one and I got the role on MAX movie right after that one. I had to learn very quickly and change the way I usually am to what the character is.

L: Can you share some advice for young aspiring actresses?

M: I just have to say to follow your dreams and if you know that you have support you can make it. If this is something that you really want to do, follow it and go through it 100% if you want to be successful and take it with courage.

buy cialis without prescription

cialis price

cialis dosage

Viagra online