Blackbaud Inc. Partners with Latinitas to Get more Girls of Color Coding

AUSTIN, TX (DATE) – Engineer Lina Nilsson shared her woes about the low numbers of females working in engineering in a recent New York Times Opinion piece[NM1] .  She cites legitimate issues of workplace discrimination and a lack of female role models, but also points out what attracts women towards STEM careers is different than their male peers.  That difference is starting to change the numbers of female enrollment in STEM classes.

Nilsson said when societal causes are attached to collegiate classes on engineering tech and science – women enroll.

At the interdisciplinary D-Lab at M.I.T., which focuses on developing “technologies that improve the lives of people living in poverty,” 74 percent of over 230 enrolled students this past year were women.  She also cited Arizona State University as a school whose humanitarian engineering courses and study options have twice as many women as its traditional engineering classes.

Capitalizing on this important trend is Austin-based Latinitas, a nonprofit focused on empowering Latina and other girls and teens using media and technology and local software supplier, Blackbaud.

Latinitas will visit Blackbaud for a 10 hour coding boot-camp July 30-31.  Girls ages 9-14 will meet Blackbaud engineers, designers, testers and programmers, and work in teams to create an app that helps community.  Community is defined as the girls themselves, their families, neighborhoods, cultures or the world.  Blackbaud staff will assist with coding lessons and will then test guide girls through testing, documentation and product marketing.

“We polled our Latinitas about what motivates them overall and the general consensus is ‘helping others.’  Blackbaud’s engineers, programmers and other technology professionals are going to help us connect girls’ passions for change with the development of an actual piece of technology innovation,” said Laura Donnelly Gonzalez, Latinitas founder and COO.

“Blackbaud is interested in promoting methods that encourage more women to study and work in technology, so we are excited to help the girls in Latinitas leverage that desire to help others into a technology product that causes societal change,” said Sally Ehrenfried, manager of philanthropy and volunteer engagement at Blackbaud.

Founded in 2002 by Alicia Rascon and Laura Donnelly, then-journalism students at UT Austin, fed up with the misrepresentation of Latinas in media, Latinitas has served over 20,000 girls and teens through after-school clubs, weekend workshops, camps and conferences at 112 schools, libraries, community centers. The organization also publishes Latinitasmagazine.org, the first and only magazine made for and by young Latinas.  Latinitas has evolved with Austin and its evolution as a tech sector, first by providing digital media training to students who lacked that access and now as a source of coding, app development, video game design and robotics education programs for Hispanic and other youth and their families.

Blackbaud is a leading global provider of  software and services specifically designed for nonprofit organizations. Its products focus on fundraising, website management, CRM, analytics, financial management, ticketing, and education administration.

Contact Laura Donnelly Gonzalez at 512.809.4618 or laura@latinitasmagazine.org for an interview.       

Laura Donnelly Gonzalez

Founder, COO Latinitas

( o ) 512.900.0304

( c ) 512.809.4618

laura@latinitasmagazine.org

www.latinitasmagazine.org

Empowering young Latinas using media and technology

 


 [NM1]I would hyperlink to the article

Alamo Drafthouse Announces 2015 Summer Kids Camp Lineup

Austin, TX –– August 2015 - Alamo Drafthouse is happy to announce the return of its annual Summer Kids Camp screenings – now 100% better, stronger and fun-er! Programmed specifically for families, Summer Kids Camp is affordable fun for all with a mix of new favorites and classic kid-friendly films.

New for this year is a “choose-your-own-ticket price” model ranging from $1 to $3 per person – you choose the amount! This new model not only allows for tickets to be purchased online, in advance with reserved seating – parents, take a moment to rejoice here – but also 100% of ticket sales will be donated to local nonprofits helping families. Now, families can have summer fun while also helping their communities.

“Kids Camp reaches almost 100,000 kids and parents during the summer, providing affordable and fun movies for everyone,” says Director of Family & Community Engagement Amy Averett.  “We are excited to grow this program to support great local nonprofits through ticket sales donations.”

Some of our inaugural nonprofit beneficiaries include: Latinitas (Austin, TX), The South Plains Food Bank (Lubbock, TX), Kalamazoo Loaves and Fishes (Kalamazoo, MI), and the YMCA (Houston, TX).

 

“We’re also excited about the variety of titles being offered this summer,” says Averett. From classics like MARY POPPINS and the original PARENT TRAP, to literary inspirations like MATILDA and CHARLOTTE’S WEB, there is a wide range of choices for families.  Also, we know that summer’s hottest new releases like JURASSIC WORLD may not work for our younger guests.  Kids Camp provides age-appropriate alternatives like THE LAND BEFORE TIME and NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM.”

Check your local drafthouse.com webpage for showtimes and keep an eye out for special Kids Camp menu discounts.  Let the summer fun begin!

Join the Alamo Drafthouse Family Facebook page to keep up with all the family events at the Alamo Drafthouse:  https://www.facebook.com/AlamoDrafthouseFamily

 

JUNE

THE LAND BEFORE TIME

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM

MARY POPPINS

DESPICABLE ME

JULY

CHARLOTTE’S WEB (2006)

CHICKEN RUN

MUPPETS MOST WANTED

MATILDA

AUGUST

THE PARENT TRAP (1961)

KUNG FU PANDA 2

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2

FOLLOW THAT BIRD

Kids Camp screenings are open to ages 3 and up. Please, no infants (parents, check out Baby Day screenings instead). All children must be accompanied by an adult. Our regular “No Talking” policy is still in effect, so noisy families may be asked to leave.

 

Press Materials Available Here:
Kids Camp Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TxxQGSpPEh0
Kids Camp Poster:
http://tinyurl.com/pwskld3

Kids Camp Series Webpage: http://drafthouse.com/packages/2015-summer-kids-camp

 

For Alamo Drafthouse Media Inquiries:

CONTACT:   Brandy Fons

PHONE:        310.809.8882

E-MAIL:         brandy@fonspr.com

 

About Alamo Drafthouse

Tim and Karrie League founded Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in 1997 as a single-screen mom and pop repertory theater in Austin. 17 years later, the now 19-location chain has been named “the best theater in America” by Entertainment Weekly and “the best theater in the world” by Wired. The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema has built a reputation as a movie lover’s oasis not only by combining food and drink service with the movie-going experience, but also introducing unique programming and high-profile, star studded special events. Alamo Drafthouse Founder & CEO, Tim League, created Fantastic Fest, a world renowned film festival dubbed “The Geek Telluride” by Variety. Fantastic Fest showcases eight days of genre cinema from independents, international filmmakers and major Hollywood studios. The Alamo Drafthouse’s collectible art gallery, Mondo, offers breathtaking, original products featuring designs from world-famous artists based on licenses for popular TV and Movie properties including Star Wars, Star Trek & Universal Monsters. The Alamo Drafthouse Cinema is expanding its brand in new and exciting ways, including Drafthouse Films, which has garnered two Academy Award nominations in its short three-year existence, and Birth.Movies.Death., an entertainment news blog curated by veteran journalist Devin Faraci.

 

###

 

Code Chica Spotlight

Why Code Chica?

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, by the time girls in middle school now go to college, there will be one million more computer science jobs than computer scientists to fill them. When we look at the number of females pursuing that career path, things look bleak, women of color pursuing technology – nearly nil . Less than one percent of high school girls express interest in majoring in computer science in college and the American Association of University Women reports only 19 percent of computer and information-science majors are currently women, less than one percent of engineers right now are Hispanic women.

Latinitas Empowering Using Media and Techology!

To combat the current underrepresentation of women in the tech industry, Latinitas, in a partnership with Google’s Made with Code campaign, developed the Code Chica Conference with the aim of getting girls excited about coding and sparking an interest in tech jobs. The first Code Chica conference was held on October 25, 2014 at Austin Community College’s Eastview Campus. Sixty girls and teens at the conference were introduced to coding with the help of professionals and graduates from local coding academy MakerSquare who facilitated the coding seminars throughout the course of the day.

Kick off! The event kicked off with a key note address from Latina engineer Karen Siles who spoke about being one of the few female employees with her job title at IBM in Austin, TX. She shared, “There is jobs waiting to be filled by a qualified woman candidate. The issue is not that there is not jobs for women in technology, the issue is that women are not choosing to take the path of attaining degrees in computer science.” Tung Huynh, an admissions recruiter at ACC Eastview, also spoke about working in tech with just one female colleague.  His company eventually hired more women who became some of the best product managers, coders, developers, engineers, account managers, and sales directors. He explained, “That’s the whole funny thing about this- girls are shy about competing and then they come in and they do better than the guys do.”  Similar to Siles experience, there were more jobs than women applying. He said, “I think today is going to go a long way towards changing that.”

Coding Begins!

Girls were introduced to the concept of coding as a means to create actions with a visual demonstration of a robot. One of the Makersquare seminar facilitators pretended to be a robot and the girls had to direct the robot to the door.   Then, they visited a Disney website and were guided through the process of using code to change a website, font colors and sizes, and delete pictures. They also used an online web based coding platform and CSS to embed video games. Girls expressed excitement as they passed from one level to the next.

Women in Tech at Lunch

At lunch girls were visited by many local powerful women in technology today. These women shared their personal, academic and professional journeys in technology. The roundtable set up made the connections more personal and powerful. Women came from Rackspace, Google, Dell, BB&T Bank, local PBS station KLRU-TV, Accruent and start ups like Stretchrecipes.com and SheHacksATX.  . Miczeh Reeze (A code chica) expressed how she will remember how the speakers gave inspiring quotes to follow their dreams.”  Jackie Lopez also noted,” The one thing that I will remember from this event are the people that visited the tables.”

Miranda Dawn from TV’s “The Voice”

It wouldn’t be a Code Chica event without having just as much “chica” as coding and so Latinitas welcomed former volunteer and current alumni from last seasons’ “The Voice,” Miranda Dawn (Miranda Oropeza), a singer/songwriter and member of her own band Dawn and Hawkes. She performed but also invited girls on-stage.

Code Afternoon:

When the “Code Chicas” returned to their assigned computer labs, they continued coding and practiced manipulating code by changing the Latinitas website. Over 60% of the attendees surveyed said they had never been to an event like this. Many of them expressed how they wished they had Latinitas at their schools. Several of the girls were also active members of Latinitas clubs and camps and expressed excitement about Code Chica. When asked if they would tell their friends about Latinitas programs and events, surveys showed a resounding “yes!” Seventh grader Elizabeth Hernandez said, “I would absolutely tell my friends about Latinitas because it’s a place where girls can dream big and have fun.”  She also said,”I liked the fact that girls were able to connect with technology.”

Code Chica presented coding on girls’ terms through fun exercises that incorporated some of their favorite brands and videos.  Coding was demystified for many girls and thanks to dedicated instructors, lunchtime career presenters and Latinitas model of empowerment, more chicas in Austin are putting themselves into the shoes of developers, designers and definitely: coders.

 

La Malinche Book Review

La Malinche, or actually Malinalli, was not the Aztec princess legend says.malinche She was royalty in the Aztec empire, but was discarded by her mother as a baby out of preference to her siblings and dodged being sacrificed upon the intervention of her loving and mystical grandmother who raised her. Well, so relays acclaimed author Laura Esquivel who is writing about a legendary character born in a time when public record was chiseled rather than written. Esquivel brought us one of the most adored narratives in Latino literature: “Like Water for Chocolate,” a novel also became an award-winning movie.

La Malinche tells us the story of a young woman finding out who she really is through the power of language.  And, though it is set in the late 1500s, early 1600s, it’s as timeless as any story about a girl finding her power in her own voice, beliefs and self.

If you are not familiar with La Malinche, legend says she is the mother of all Mexico, or, for many, she is also remembered as the destroyer of all Mexico .  La Malinche, represented by the character Malinalli in Esquivel’s book, was multi-lingual and could translate Nahuatl of her elders to Spanish and vice versa. As a result, she gained the fondness of Spanish conquerer Hernán Cortes.  In Esquivel’s story it’s clear Cortes is drawn to Malinalli, but we are not sure if it is his bloodthirst for power that drives his admiration. Feeling discarded by her mother, Malinalli gains worth in Cortes’ troops as a translator and in a romance with him that produces beloved children of her own.

But, after Cortes repeatedly uses her to conquer and kill the native people of Mexico, she sees him more for the short, unhappy, power hungry villain that earned the nickname early on: La Malinche, in which she was named for.  It is so rare we get to read a story of Mexican or any Latino history from the point of view of a girl. It is also rare to get a whole sensory experience in a book and Esquivel is all about revealing tastes, smells and what a time feels like. Malinalli shares that the Spanish soldiers reek of the garlic they eat and don’t bathe often.  Though we have perceptions of “primitive” life, such as that of the tribes that existed in what is now Mexico and that Spain was “developed” or “advanced,” in just a few short lines we realize native peoples of America were leaps ahead of their European visitors – even if it was just about good hygiene.

What I most loved about this book which I’d recommend any teen reader is how La Malinche is not demonized in this story as she is in most accounts. She is made human. We find out her need for human love, the rejection of her mothers’ love and her place as a girl in a society where human sacrifices were necessary and common. We learn about her bravery, contributions to Mexican history and a broader picture of who Malinalli (La Malinche) was.

Janani Janakiraman: Making Latinitas into Robot Chicas

Janani Janakiraman is Latinitas favorite kind of volunteer. Though highly qualified on her own as an engineer at IBM, Janani never comesjanani (2) alone – she comes with a task force that includes her oldest daughter Divya and her twin sisters Priya and Kavya and some of their friends from Westwood Highschool’s Spanish Honor Society or the engineering program at the University of Texas at Austin. This Spring, Janani led “Robot Chica” – Latinitas first Lego Mindstorms workshop.  We are also grateful to Janani for acquiring some of our first tablets at Latinitas – she truly comes to youth empowerment with a lot of gifts.

Latinitas: What was your experience like teaching Robot Chica?

Janani: I had a lot of fun teaching the kids how to program a Robot. I was amazed to see how even kids as young as second grade picked up programming via Lego Mindstorms very quickly.  Programming involves logical thinking, creativity and patience to complete tasks. Its always interesting to see the spark in the kids eyes when they are able to build things on their own.

 Latinitas: You get your own daughters involved in volunteering also – why?

Janani: I have three daughters and we volunteer as a family. I work full time and it started out as a way for me to spend more time with my kids and volunteer at the same time. We made fun shared memories while doing STEM based activities. It has now evolved to me depending on them to do most of the training when we host these workshops. My girls enjoy being role models for the other kids, especially girls, to show them that STEM is fun.

Latinitas: What were you like as a girl and how do you think that helped you become an engineer?

Janani: I grew up in India and was fortunate enough to be in a family where we were never held back. My mom was a high school math teacher, my dad an engineer and my hometown was filled with engineers working in the steel industry. So I grew up with great role models. I was always curious about how things worked and math was my favorite subject in school. I gravitated towards engineering without too much thought.

Latinitas: Where is your favorite place to be in the world?

Janani: My favorite place is a museum. Whenever we travel, we look for museums to visit. My favorite museums are ones which are hands on. Did you know that Austin has tons of museums and in September, on free museum day, you can visit all the museums for free?

 

Latinitas Honors Renowned Photographer Diego Huerta

AUSTIN, TX – May 28, 2015 – Celebrating it’s 8th annual Fotos de mi Alma photography auction,

Latinitas will mark the occasion by featuring a number of pieces representative of the cultural

work of Austin‐based photographer Diego Huerta.

The event will highlight Mr. Huerta’s remarkable work, and will be complemented by a

collection of photos from photographers around the world. The sale of these pieces will serve as

the major fundraising effort of the year for Latinitas, a non‐profit organization dedicated to

empowering young Latina girls through media and technology education.

The auction will take place Thursday June 11th from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm at the IBC Bank

Community Suite located at the bank’s Austin headquarters at the corner of Fifth and San

Antonio streets.

Joining the event as keynote speaker will be film director Carmen Marron, whose exceptional

journey into the competitive world of film‐making, has made her into a true Hispanic role

model. Her films include “Go for It”, a coming of age movie about goals and choices, starring

Gina Rodriguez of “Jane the Virgin” fame.

“We couldn’t be more proud to have Diego’s work as the foundation for this year’s auction.”

Said Latinitas board president, Ana Ruelas. “His artistic accomplishments deserve to be

recognized for the cultural contribution he is making to elevating perceptions, not only of

Mexico, but of all of Latin America. That we have him working out of Austin is a huge privilege

and source of pride for our community.”

Mr. Huerta has dazzled audiences with “31K Portraits of Peace”, a photo documentary of the

majesty of Mexico’s people and places. His work has been an effort to counter the negative

perceptions of Mexico as a dangerous and unlikeable place.

“The outstanding collection of photographs in this year’s auction should be a real treat for all

those who appreciate the power of photography as a story telling platform,” said Latinitas cofounder

and executive director, Laura Donnelly. “I expect this year’s event to be the most

successful in our organization’s history.”

Tickets for the event can be purchased online at:

www.fotosdemialma.com

About Latinitas

Founded by Laura Donnelly and Alicia Rascon, Latinitas is a non‐profit organization dedicated to

helping enable young Latinas to achieve personal and academic success through media and

technology education. With a variety of enriching experiences, Latinitas discover their voice and

develop media skills while building a solid foundation for their future.

Contact: Laura Donnelly, Executive Director. 512‐900‐0304 laura@latinitasmagazine.org

Southwest Key Says Thanks

Thank you so much for all you do to support the growth and development of young ladies in our community.  Your services are relevant and engaging and cover a wide variety of topics.  Most girls are able to find something appealing and interesting at your camps no matter how unique their interests may be.  Moreover, your scholarship offerings make your services accessible for families that would not be able to afford this opportunity otherwise.  On a personal note, I cannot express my gratitude for you working with one of my clients this past spring.  I referred her for services, and she reluctantly agreed to give it a try.  This young lady had been through many challenges and was struggling to find herself amidst a negative peer group and emotional turmoil.  There were many demands at home leaving the family with no disposal income.  Thanks to Latinitas providing her a full scholarship, she was able to participate in the Spring Break camp which she absolutely loved.  She made sure to let me know on numerous occasions how much she enjoyed and appreciated the program.  From what I understand, this young lady has been doing so well and is continuing to achieve success.  A week may not seem like a long time, but even a week long camp can have far-reaching impact if available at a pivotal moment in someone’s life.  I believe this is exactly the case for the child I referred to you.  Thank you for helping her explore and access a new perspective and positive outlook on life.

Thank you again for all you do.

Best regards,

Courtney Seals

 

Workshop Testimonials

“Thank you so much for the opportunity to participate in such a wonderful event.  My daughter Fabiola truly enjoyed the game design adventure and is excited about starting her own game.  She is already talking about who might be her “BETA” testers. I am very impressed with your program.”

Maria Guadalupe Palop

Mother, Software Engineer

Code Chica Conference Recap 2014

 

classroom10 - CopyWhy Code Chica? 

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, by the time girls in middle school now go to college, there will be one million more computer science jobs than computer scientists to fill them. When we look at the number of females pursuing that career path, things look bleak, women of color pursuing technology – nearly nil . Less than one percent of high school girls express interest in majoring in computer science in college and the American Association of University Women reports only 19 percent of computer and information-science majors are currently women, less than one percent of engineers right now are Hispanic women.

Latinitas Empowering Using Media and Techology!  Check out the video!

To combat the current under-representation of women in the tech industry, Latinitas, in a partnership with Google’s Made with Code campaign, developed the Code Chica Conference with the aim of getting girls excited about coding and sparking an interest in tech jobs. The first Code Chica conference was held on October 25, 2014 at Austin Community College’s Eastview Campus. Sixty girls and teens at the conference were introduced to coding with the help of professionals and graduates from local coding academy MakerSquare who facilitated the coding seminars throughout the course of the day.

Kick off! The event kicked off with a key note address from Latina engineer Karen Siles who spoke about being one of the few female employees with her job title at IBM in Austin, TX. She shared, “There is jobs waiting to be filled by a qualified woman candidate. The issue is not that there is not jobs for women in technology, the issue is that women are not choosing to take the path of attaining degrees in computer science.” Tung Huynh, an admissions recruiter at ACC Eastview, also spoke about working in tech with just one female colleague.  His company eventually hired more women who became some of the best product managers, coders, developers, engineers, account managers, and sales directors. He explained, “That’s the whole funny thing about this- girls are shy about competing and then they come in and they do better than the guys do.”  Similar to Siles experience, there were more jobs than women applying. He said, “I think today is going to go a long way towards changing that.”

Coding Begins!

Girls were introduced to the concept of coding as a means to create actions with a visual demonstration of a robot. One of the Makersquare seminar facilitators pretended to be a robot and the girls had to direct the robot to the door.   Then, they visited a Disney website and were guided through the process of using code to change a website, font colors and sizes, and delete pictures. They also used an online web based coding platform and CSS to embed video games. Girls expressed excitement as they passed from one level to the next.

Women in Tech at Lunch

At lunch girls were visited by many local powerful women in technology today. These women shared their personal, academic and professional journeys in technology. The roundtable set up made the connections more personal and powerful. Women came from Rackspace, Google, Dell, BB&T Bank, local PBS station KLRU-TV, Accruent and start ups like Stretchrecipes.com and SheHacksATX.  . Miczeh Reeze (A code chica) expressed how she will remember how the speakers gave inspiring quotes to follow their dreams.”  Jackie Lopez also noted,” The one thing that I will remember from this event are the people that visited the tables.”

Miranda Dawn from TV’s “The Voice”

It wouldn’t be a Code Chica event without having just as much “chica” as coding and so Latinitas welcomed former volunteer and current alumni from last seasons’ “The Voice,” Miranda Dawn (Miranda Oropeza), a singer/songwriter and member of her own band Dawn and Hawkes. She performed but also invited girls on-stage.

Code Afternoon:

When the “Code Chicas” returned to their assigned computer labs, they continued coding and practiced manipulating code by changing the Latinitas website. Over 60% of the attendees surveyed said they had never been to an event like this. Many of them expressed how they wished they had Latinitas at their schools. Several of the girls were also active members of Latinitas clubs and camps and expressed excitement about Code Chica. When asked if they would tell their friends about Latinitas programs and events, surveys showed a resounding “yes!” Seventh grader Elizabeth Hernandez said, “I would absolutely tell my friends about Latinitas because it’s a place where girls can dream big and have fun.”  She also said,”I liked the fact that girls were able to connect with technology.”

Code Chica presented coding on girls’ terms through fun exercises that incorporated some of their favorite brands and videos.  Coding was demystified for many girls and thanks to dedicated instructors, lunchtime career presenters and Latinitas model of empowerment, more chicas in Austin are putting themselves into the shoes of developers, designers and definitely: coders.

Sara Martinez: A Latinitas Story

Eleven years ago, Sara Martinez joined one of the first Latinitas after school programs at Martin Middle School in Austin, TX.  Her journey from then to now – becoming a musician, travelling to Japan, studying cosmetology, using that skill to afford college and apply to the University of Texas at Austin and now plans to be an international journalist is more than inspiring and impressive – it’s the dream we had for every chica who walked in Latinitas’ door!  Below Sara shares what Latinitas meant to her growing up, but also, more so, what a dynamic and thoughtful person she has always been.

What did you like about cutting hair/studying cosmetology?

SM: Ever since I was a little girl. Something that I cared about was my hair because I felt like it was part of my identity. A different style, color or cut can dramatically change a person’s image and self confidence, and that was something that attracted me to cosmetology. I liked studying cosmetology because I enjoyed watching how a person’s self confidence would go up after getting something done to their hair. Seeing their smile after seeing the finished product was something that kept me going throughout my years at cosmetology school.

What is it that draws you to journalism?

SM: When I was younger, I was very shy and stuttered frequently. I felt like I had no voice so I really liked to express myself through writing and social media which I discovered through Latinitas in middle school. Deep down inside through my years in high school, I felt that I wanted to study in college something that would help improve myself as a person. Because of my love of journalism, I have a physical voice now because I want to be heard. My stuttering and shyness in front of big groups of people has gone away because of my love of expressing my opinion. Majoring in journalism not only gives me the chance to be a voice but to also make sure that other people’s voices are being heard as well.

What’s next for Sara Martinez?

SM: My dream is to become an international music and fashion journalist. I’m expected to graduate with a degree in Journalism and a minor in fashion design next year. I’ve been studying Japanese for about four years now and I got a chance to live there during the summer of 2013; it is an experience that I hold very dear to my heart. I’m hoping to relocate to Japan after graduation so I can become a native speaker and attend a Japanese language school while looking for work. I want to find work in the Japanese television and magazine industry because that is a big market in Japan. During my trip, I discovered that although American pop culture is well known there, our actual culture is confusing to understand at times because it is completely different compared to Japanese culture. I want to become a bridge and a voice that will help Japanese people understand as to why things are the way they are in America. My love of learning and culture is something that has set me apart from a typical Latina and I think its because of my mixed heritage and being a first-generation american in my family. Given the chance to go to one of the top universities in the world and being part of a top ranked program has taught me that if I try really hard and follow my heart, then amazing things are possible. I want to be a person that can be looked up to.

What’s something about you that sets you apart as a “Latinita?”

SM: Latinitas was the reason why I was able to work my way to becoming the person that I am today. Coming from a family that is considered lower class here, made me think that I wouldn’t be able accomplish much in life. But looking back, I feel that I have accomplished so much and I haven’t even graduated college yet. Being a Latinita brought my self-confidence up and has given me the drive to make a difference like Laura, the CEO of Latinitas Magazine. What sets me apart as a “Latinita” is that I am confident and although I know that I make mistakes, that will never bring me down. Being mentored by Laura taught me that many things are possible and that dreams do come true if you are strong enough to pull through all the hard obstacles that come our way. Being a “Latinita” is something important because wherever this life takes me, the lessons and experiences with Latinitas will always be with me and giving me the drive to make a difference.

buy cialis without prescription

cialis price

cialis dosage

Viagra online